Letters to the Editor for Thursday, Sep. 19

first_imgGazette should not endorse in electionsAs the upcoming political elections draw near, I would like to request that The Daily Gazette refrain from endorsing any candidate or issue that is on the ballot.In our country, the news media, including The Gazette, is under extreme pressure to justify its existence as a legitimate and unbiased news source.In many cases, it fails to make that justification. While any newspaper has every right to express its opinion, endorsing any candidate or issue reinforces the perception that it backs one candidate or political party over another and reduces the credibility of The Gazette as an unbiased reporter of the news.Rather, I would encourage The Gazette to identify the candidates and initiatives on the ballot, provide their positions on each of the major issues, provide the strengths and weaknesses of any initiative, and let the voter or reader decide for him or herself.Ken MooreSchenectady Tell officials to vote no on 5G wirelessEveryone is concerned about climate change, which I think is a hoax. The Bible says there will always be the sunrise and sunset.People will continue to go on living as usual until God decides to come back to Earth and make changes.A 5G crisis summit was held recently and free online from Aug. 26 through Sept. 1. It had many knowledgeable speakers. 5G stands for fifth generation cellular wireless, which is very harmful to people, animals, insects, plants, etc. There are thousands of independent studies concluding that wireless radiation causes biological harm.According to these professional scientists, physicians and engineers, we should be very worried about the placing of 20,000 high-frequency radiation-emitting satellites, starting with Space X’s newly FCC-approved 4,425 they want to put into orbit over the next few years. This means we will have more cell installations near our homes and in every neighborhood.Meteorologists issued a statement in June of this year. They are worried 5G will disrupt their ability to sense the weather.So don’t worry about the climate change hoax, but do worry about 5G radiation. Call your elected officials and tell them we do not want this. What we have now is bad enough.Audrey SaltsmanJohnstown Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionPoliticians should pass sensible lawsThe math is simple.There are nominally 8,760 hours in a calendar year.Our wonderful politicians are proposing limiting flavors in vaping products because five individuals this year died from the assumed use of those products.This amounts to one person dying from a self-inflicted addiction every 0.0006 hours. On the flip side 14,542 people were murdered in 2018 with guns. This amounts to 1.7 murders per hour from guns where the victims often had little say about their unfortunate demise.Ignoring a cause of one of death being 180,000 times greater than the other shows the pols have taken the easy way out claiming the crisis they are solving for us is vaping while keeping contentious gun regulations at a distance.I support the Second Amendment, but it was written when the state of the art was muzzle-loading flint locks, and we did not have a permanent standing army.The state of the art has evolved beyond what our forefathers could have imagined and needs to be revisited.We did not require registrations and insurance for a horse and buggy, but we now do for an automobile. Now that might be appropriate to firearms given their proliferation. Wouldn’t it be nice if the politicians could use their thinking ends instead of worrying about their legislative seating end and do something meaningful? The foundation of a democracy is the ability to compromise, which seems to be fading.R. Jeffrey WarrickSchenectadycenter_img More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Thursday, Dec. 26

first_imgAfter reading Wendell Neugebauer’s Dec. 6 letter “Assisted suicide laws do more harm,” I feel compelled to speak for many who face a situation similar to the one my family is facing.Please reference Eleanor Aronstein’s fact-filled letter on Dec. 13 (“Allow New Yorkers to die with dignity”).My ex-husband no longer has a voice to express his fears and wishes. My grown children’s father is diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). His children lovingly took him into their homes and fully supported him, physically, emotionally and financially, until it became impossible.He is now in an assisted living facility, but as his condition continues to deteriorate, his quality of life diminishes. He has lost his ability to laugh, smile, communicate or control his body.A proud and meticulous man, he would never have chosen to end his life like this. I cannot say what choice he would have made between this slow and painful way, or to “die peacefully’’, but he would not have opted to have his children see him tied into a wheelchair to keep him safe and have his loved ones witness such a demise.Mr. Neugebauer’s cutting paragraph about “greedy relatives” not wanting to see their inheritance “frittered away” changed my anger to tears. I’m sad for him and anyone who fears that that’s how their relatives would treat their end days. But unless you have walked in the moccasins of those who live this nightmare, you know not of what you speak.  Jill McGrathHowes CaveIf Joe Biden gets in, he must impeachedIn 2013, Harry Reid (D-NV) changed Senate rules to use the so-called “nuclear option” to allow the Senate to basically approve any candidate for a federal judge position with a simple majority versus two-thirds rule.Using the same rules Reid implemented in 2013, the Republican Senate has approved a record number of judges to the bench.Unfortunately for Democrats, all of them are conservative. This will impact the Supreme Court and all federal courts for years.Now we have an impeachment passed by the Democrats in a totally partisan process.The bar on the impeachment has reached a new low. The articles of impeachment don’t identify a “high crime or misdemeanor” by any definition. No bribery, no quid pro quo.  Strictly as a non-professional in law, I would suggest that Hunter Biden and his dad, Joe Biden, should be investigated in the hiring of Hunter by Burisma as a member of its board. He had no experience on the job. He landed a spot on a corrupt Ukraine oil company’s board of directors and got paid an obscene monthly payment. It’s obvious to the most casual observer that his last name got him the job.If Joe Biden gets the job of president of the United States and the Republicans get control of the House, the first order of the House of Representatives should be his impeachment. If not, every Democrat should be asked if they are comfortable with what Hunter and Joe did in Ukraine. What goes around, comes around.Mark SampsonNiskayunaEllen’s generosity worthy of giddinessThis is in response to Rick Splawnik’s Dec. 18 letter (“Ellen audience a bit too giddy over gifts.”): If you have ever watched the Ellen DeGeneres Show, you would know that she has 12 days of giveaways during Christmas season. No, they are not just a free toaster or whatever. They are gifts that are worth thousands of dollars. They are trips, gift cards, etc. So yes, I would be just as giddy as them. In fact, I have been to the bonus days of giveaways at the Ellen Show years ago and there were gifts that totaled more than $2,000, and the show even paid the taxes on what we were given. I had donated everything I received to a family who needed it more.Ellen is not only generous, she is funny. So maybe next time you can sit down and actually watch her show.Judy YoungRotterdamPoorly chosen words promote stereotypesThe Dec. 18 article, “Official: ‘Gang-related’ fight breaks out in Schenectady High hallway” includes a quote from district spokesperson Karen Corona, “Kids (are) bringing issues from the community into the school…sometimes the kids just show up and they start fighting.” Both Corona’s comment and the headline of this article support stereotypes that Schenectady students know only violence. They also highlight a larger lack of understanding for how external factors affect student performance.Issues of the community cannot be detached from school, for they are both apart of a larger community. Rather than perpetuating the idea that students should detach school life from their community, they should be supported in figuring out the interconnections.Superintendent Larry Spring’s comment on focusing on solutions rather than blaming students would have made for a less divisive heading.By solely relegating the high school’s issues into being gang-related, the community becomes scared off. And it is only through engagement that we can hope to grow.Intent does not negate impact, and the impact of this headline and Corona’s comment perpetuate longstanding racist and classist stereotypes. Thus, Schenectady students have been failed support and are owed a great apology.I call upon readers to think reflexively over the words you use in relation to Schenectady High and the assumptions they make.If your words smuggle in gross stereotypes, then you halt progress and bolster discrimination.Grace HerrmannSchenectady Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionDon’t discount love in assisted suicides Allow secret ballots in Senate trialI urge Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, who will serve as judge for the impeachment trial in the Senate, to take politics out of the trial.Senators serve as the jury. Allow them to have a secret ballot. All other jury trials are secret ballot, and the Constitution doesn’t prohibit this. Remove the threat of Trump’s attacks against those who vote for impeachment.I suggest this will make the trial fair and impartial.Herb DieckGlenvilleBring the Stockade’s roads up to standardThe Stockade is one of Schenectady’s jewels, with its long history, many important structures and some small businesses.The condition of its streets is deplorable.When does the city expect to address this? Union Street from Erie to Washington is an adventure in pothole-dodging, and it’s only December. This would seem like a good place to invest.Perhaps before we make the city Smart, we can bring its streets up to 20th century standards.Mark VermilyeaNiskayuna Impeachment is a hollow win for DemsCongratulations Democrats for a tremendous win for our country. The impeachment of Donald Trump is an enormous victory.I think the leadership of Schumer, Pelosi, Nadler, Schiff, among others is very commendable. They have successfully and, might I add, finally accomplished something in the nearly three years of Trump’s presidency. May you all be very proud. Stand tall, shout “impeachment” from the rooftops. Why? Because at the end of the day, that’s all you will have. He won’t be removed from office. And even if he were to be removed, he could simply run again. Oh yes, it’s true. He would win also, again, because clearly, there is no one who can beat him. Joe Biden? I don`t think we want to have his abuse of power exposed like that, do we? How else could his son get on the Burisma board with no experience or knowledge in that field making $50,000 a month? Well, I’m happy for you Dems, to be honest. You finally got this done. Congratulations.Brian BaldwinBurnt Hills More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img

Will higher rates hit the office sector?

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Local priority

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South Manchester offices: Southern promise

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Offices: Holborn-again

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Let’s get together

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The call of the east

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Birmingham summit provides sounding board for property

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Bernie Sanders is not a friend of Wall St, but he has fans there

first_img“I’m not Lloyd Blankfein — I work in a family owned business, I’m a small business guy. I see the health insurance bill every month,” said Wade Black, a founding member of Scarsdale Equities, an investment group.- Political diversity on Wall Street -The 45-year-old Black — who spoke to AFP at his office in Rockefeller Center in the heart of Manhattan — is a card-carrying Democrat who says he has moved farther left with age.And he believes that Wall Street is not as conservative as political legend would have it.”A lot of people who work on Wall Street are just salaried — they’re not overcompensated hedge fund managers. There are clerks and admin people,” Black said.”I’d be shocked if they didn’t reflect somewhat of the diversity of the political opinion that America has.”That opinion is shared by Dan Alpert, a 61-year-old co-founder of the New York investment bank Westwood Capital.”Wall Street has become younger. You don’t know what the young people are really thinking because they can’t talk — they’re muzzled,” Alpert said.”And those people who are left who are older are generally in the C suite or near C suite level and just humming the party line.”Alpert thinks that income inequality in America has helped Sanders’ underlying campaign platform to resonate, even in the world of finance.There are no polls that would indicate the percentage of those in banking and finance who support Sanders.But according to the Center for Responsive Politics, which tracks donations made by individuals and political action committees of $200 or more, Sanders has received $1.7 million from the finance, insurance and real estate sectors since he launched his 2020 campaign. Out of a total of $108 million, it’s not an insignificant amount, though it pales in comparison to the $4.4 million raised from the sectors by Indiana moderate Pete Buttigieg, or the $4.1 million raked in by Biden.Trump has taken in $2.7 million from the same sectors.However, Sanders has taken in virtually nothing from hedge funds, private investment groups or venture capital funds — he brags that most of his campaign is funded by small-time individual donors.Black says he sent about $400 to the Sanders campaign, and did it when he felt the senator was unfairly attacked.- Is he a threat to markets? -While Sanders regularly criticizes Wall Street and the world of high finance, bemoaning the whims of the “one percent” and championing the other 99 percent of Americans, his backers in the sector don’t feel targeted.”He’s talking about investment banking firms, the Goldmans and Bank of America of the world. They wield incredible power, more than they did in 2008″ at the time of the global financial crisis, says Black.Sanders’ platform calls for dismantling banks that are “too big to fail” and to end what he calls impunity for their leaders. For several American billionaires, these proposed reforms and others along the same lines could spark a market crash if Sanders wins the White House and makes good on his promises.”They said the same thing about Trump and the market actually did fall the day after the election — and then turned around,” Alpert says, calling the fears about Sanders “preposterous.”Topics : That would give him the right to take on Republican incumbent Donald Trump in November.Sanders’ plans to hike taxes on the wealthy and tighten government controls of the banking and finance sectors have certainly spooked New York’s finance leaders.Former Goldman Sachs chief Lloyd Blankfein has said Sanders is “as polarizing as Trump,” and billionaire hedge fund manager Leon Cooperman has called Sanders a “communist” who poses a bigger threat to the markets than the deadly new coronavirus epidemic.But others in the finance industry have welcomed the possibility of a Sanders presidency with enthusiasm. Democratic presidential frontrunner Bernie Sanders likes to take aim at Wall Street and everything it represents — big money, big power. But even in the world of New York finance, he has supporters.The self-described “democratic socialist” is riding high in the polls — the latest national average offered by RealClearPolitics puts him a full 10 points in front of former vice president Joe Biden at 27.8 percent. And some pundits are saying that if the 78-year-old senator from Vermont continues to do well, he might have an insurmountable lead in terms of delegates by Super Tuesday on March 3. last_img read more