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Great lastminute Fathers Day gifts for 2019

first_img See at Walmart Apple Iron Man tops Father’s Day picks for best sci-fi, fantasy dads 11 great gifts under $100 you can still get in time for Father’s Day 14 great Father’s Day gifts under $50 Available at Walmart Dad loves wine, but probably doesn’t have time to seek out the best red blends or summer whites. Fortunately, Firstleaf offers expert curating depending on Dad’s preferences, then delivers six different bottles for him to try. This can happen at regular intervals (every one to three months), or just as a one-off.The first shipment is just $40. Subsequent ones will be $79. In both cases, shipping is free when you use our link below. And while the first box won’t arrive in time for Father’s Day, just present Dad with any bottle of wine to represent the gift that’s coming. Easy peasy. Firstleaf Wine Club: First six bottles for $40 (save $39), plus free shipping for one year CBS All Access gift card: $25 and up Mobile Mobile Accessories Storage Wearable Tech Toys and Tabletop Games Smart Speakers & Displays Available same-day via Drizly See at Amazon Whatever Dad’s libation of preference, you can get it delivered same-day via Drizly, which works with local liquor shops. This particular whiskey is one I’m suddenly hearing mentioned all over the place, but it’s just one example of the kind of spirit you can get for dear old Dad. Ben Fox Rubin/CNET With its Lightning connector at one end and USB/Micro-USB hybrid connector at the other, this high-capacity drive works with just about any device Dad owns. There’s even a USB-C adapter to accommodate his latest and greatest hardware.The $21.93 price is yours when you click the on-page 5%-off coupon and then apply promo code BWD3ZF88 at checkout. Is Dad constantly running out of juice for his phone? Laptop? Nintendo Switch? All of the above? This “Beast” of a portable power bank can charge them all, and then some. Use code 6EU9D2TR at checkout to score this exclusive discount. Bosch Available locally and online Now playing: Watch this: Amazon remains your best bet if you do need something delivered, as Prime subscribers can now get one-day shipping on many items. From there, look to stores like Best Buy and Walmart, where you may have the option of in-store pickup.Below I’ve rounded up some Father’s Day gift ideas you still have time to get, with subscription options at the top, in-store options below that and then Amazon picks. Read more: CNET’s complete Father’s Day gift guide Total nepotism play, here. (CNET is owned by CBS.) But that doesn’t change the fact that Dad would almost certainly enjoy new shows like Star Trek: Discovery, The Good Fight and The Twilight Zone, plus a massive library of old ones like MacGyver and Taxi.A $25 gift card would be good for four full months of the service (at the $5.99-per-month, limited-commercials rate). See at Amazon Omars Beast 26,800-mAh Portable Charger with AC Outlet: $63 (save $37) with code It’s not even Prime Day, and Amazon is already running one of the best Echo deals to date. At $65, the full-size smart speaker is a whopping 35% off. Of course, Dad doesn’t have to know that. He’ll just know that you got him an attractive, nice-sounding speaker loaded with Alexa smarts.That price is good on all three fabric-cover colors; you can also get one of the wood finishes for $20 more. Apple Watch: $199 and up Bosch GLM20 compact laser distance measure: $29.97 (save $20) The Cheapskate See at Amazon Omars Echo smart speaker: $65 See at Amazon Amazon Echo review See at Drizly Great gadgets for Dad at all prices Escape rooms are a blast, and should appeal to any dad’s puzzle-loving nature. Bring a group and try to find all the clues and solve all the puzzles before time runs out.Most rooms are themed — mad scientist, cold-war spies, zombies run amok and so on — and tickets usually run around $30 per person. Below I’ve included a link to national chain Escape the Room, but you can also hit up Groupon, and you should find package deals for any number of rooms in your area.Better yet, call the business directly and ask if they’ll give you the same deal they’re advertising on Groupon. It’s a much better option for them, and you’ll still get a discount. Jun 14 • Make it a 4K Father’s Day: Save on 4K TVs at Best Buy and Walmart Tickets to an escape room: Around $30 per person See at Firstleaf Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Available on Amazon See at Walmart Ever wish you had a better idea what makes Dad tick? Get him this card game — and play it with him! It’s a deck designed to spark discussions about ideas, perspectives and, well, how you see the world. It’s normally $25, but CNET readers can get $5 off with promo code CNET2019. How Do You See the World? card game: $20 (save $5) with code Available at Amazon Eachine See at Amazon See at Amazon Nikka Coffey Malt Whiskey: $55 and up Nikka All current Apple Watch sales Father’s Day Tech Gift Guide Time’s up! Father’s Day is tomorrow, so any last-minute gift shipping needs to happen now. For starters, consider some kind of subscription (like the Firstleaf Wine Club, below), which you can purchase instantly and doesn’t require any kind of immediate delivery. CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! Tags Available at Amazon and Walmart Available at Amazon Firstleaf Available at Amazon A must-have for every Dad’s toolbox, the GLM20 replaces that clunky old tape measure with laser-powered precision. It’s a cinch to operate — there’s just one button — and the price is as low as it’s ever been.Looking for another tool gift? Lowe’s has the Bosch Freak 18-volt Cordless Impact Driver for $89 — a savings of 40%. It may well be in stock at your local store, making it a true last-minute option.  Father’s Day 2019 Wivic Available at Amazon Authentic Agility Watch this space for more last-minute gift ideas as Father’s Day gets closer! If Dad owns an iPhone, the Apple Watch is just about the perfect companion. It handles messaging, heart-rate monitoring, exercise tracking and tons more. Oh, yeah, it tells time, too.The price to beat right now is $199 for Apple Watch Series 3 38mm (with black or white sport band), or the slightly larger 42mm model for $229. The link below will take you to Walmart’s product page, but you can also get the Apple Watch Series for $199 at Amazon.You can class up this gift by adding something like a Milanese watch band for $12. While you’re at it, look at all the other inexpensive Apple Watch accessories you can get for Dad. Amazon Apple 1:10 • Share your voice See at Escape the Room Available online Jun 14 • Gifts for dads who enjoy their booze Jun 14 • Gifts for dads who love breakfast See All Wivic 4-in-1 128GB flash drive: $21.93 with code reading • Great last-minute Father’s Day gifts for 2019 Available at Amazon 8 Comments Get Dad this drone. Seriously. It’s ridiculously cool and comes with a paraglider guy that can ride parachute-style or on top of it, like some kind of crazy flying skateboarder. It normally sells for $35, but you can snag a solid discount with promo code ZV4YT927.I have this. I’ve flown it. It’s a blast. Dad will love it. Eachine E019 Stunt Drone: $21 (save $14) with code Walmart Zsolt Dobak, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0last_img read more

Two new Saturnmass exoplanets discovered

first_img Explore further Citation: Two new Saturn-mass exoplanets discovered (2017, May 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-saturn-mass-exoplanets.html The planets were discovered by researchers working as part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) group and the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) collaboration. OGLE uses the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, while MOA utilizes the 1.8-m MOA-II telescope at the Mount John University Observatory, located in New Zealand. The main goal of these two microlensing surveys is to study the planet formation around late-type stars.Gravitational microlensing is an invaluable method of detecting new extrasolar planets circling their parent stars relatively closely. This technique is sensitive to planets orbiting beyond the so-called “snow line” around relatively faint host stars like M dwarfs or brown dwarfs. It is a location in the proto-planetary disk where the water ice may condense and where gas giant planets are believed to be formed. Therefore, understanding the distribution of exoplanets in this region could offer important clues to how planets form.Recently, OGLE and MOA scientists led by Przemek Mróz of the Warsaw University Observatory in Poland, have found planetary anomalies in two faint microlensing events designated OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721. “Both events showed clear deviations from the simple point-source point-lens model, caused by the presence of a second body with well-measured planet-to-host mass ratios of (5.15 ± 0.28) x 10-4 and (13.18 ± 0.72) x 10-4, respectively,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The newly discovered planets received designation OGLE-2013-BLG-0132b and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721b. Both planets likely belong to a group of sub-Jupiter-mass planets orbiting M dwarfs beyond the snow line distance.According to the research, OGLE-2013-BLG-0132b has a mass of about 0.29 Jupiter masses and orbits its parent star at a distance of 3.6 AU. The planet’s host is located about 12,700 light years away and has a mass of approximately 0.54 solar masses. With a mass of about 0.64 Jupiter masses, OGLE-2013-BLG-1721b is circling its host (0.46 solar masses) at a distance of 2.6 AU. This planetary system is located some 20,500 light years away from the Earth.The researchers estimated the masses of the planets using the Bayesian analysis as both events were short and faint, which prevented them from measuring a reliable parallax signal.”Both events were too short and too faint to measure a reliable parallax signal and hence the lens mass. We therefore used a Bayesian analysis to estimate masses of both planets,” the paper reads.The team noted that in order to uncover more properties of the two newly discovered planetary systems, follow-up high-resolution imaging observations should be conducted in the future. In particular, the Near InfRared Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched into space in late 2018, could reveal important insights about these new Saturn-mass exoworlds. Light curve of OGLE-2013-BLG-0132. The inset shows the enlargement of the caustic crossing parts of the light curve. The lower panel shows the residuals from the best-fit model. Credit: Mróz et al., 2017. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected two new giant alien worlds circling distant stars. The newly found planets are estimated to be as massive as Saturn and are orbiting M dwarfs beyond the snow line. The findings were presented May 2 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print server. More information: OGLE-2013-BLG-0132Lb and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721Lb: Two Saturn-mass Planets Discovered around M-dwarfs, arXiv:1705.01058 [astro-ph.EP] arxiv.org/abs/1705.01058AbstractWe present the discovery of two planetary systems consisting of a Saturn-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf, which were detected in faint microlensing events OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721. The planetary anomalies were covered with high cadence by OGLE and MOA photometric surveys. The light curve modeling indicates that planet-host mass ratios are (5.15±0.28)×10−4 and (13.18±0.72)×10−4, respectively. Both events were too short and too faint to measure a reliable parallax signal and hence the lens mass. We therefore used a Bayesian analysis to estimate masses of both planets: 0.29+0.16−0.13 MJup (OGLE-2013-BLG-0132Lb) and 0.64+0.35−0.31 MJup (OGLE-2013-BLG-1721Lb). Thanks to a high relative proper motion, OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 is a promising candidate for the high-resolution imaging follow-up. Both planets belong to an increasing sample of sub-Jupiter-mass planets orbiting M-dwarfs beyond the snow line. © 2017 Phys.org Massive exoplanet discovered using gravitational microlensing methodlast_img read more

Solving mazes with singlemolecule DNA navigators

first_imgImplementing the single-molecule DNA navigator. a) Schematic illustration of the PSEC system. An acyclic connected graph (i.e. a tree) is constructed on a rectangular DNA origami substrate of 100 x 70 nm^2. T1 and T2 are two types of fuels driving the PSEC on the tree. Initiator I was used to trigger the initiation of the PSEC from the entrance vertex ENT. b) propagation mechanism of the PSEC system. Initiator I recognizes and opens the T1ent hairpin at vertex ENT. The opened hairpin then captures and opens a T2 hairpin from the environment to start the cascade. c) A straight line paved by PSEC and visualized with DNA-PAINT. d) Four paved digits of “2017” imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The T1 hairpins at the corner points were modified to prevent unwanted spans. The arrows indicate the direction of propagation. Credit: Nature Materials, doi: 10.1038/s41563-018-0205-3. © 2018 Science X Network Tying the knot: New DNA nanostructures , Science In the present study by Chao et al, the same basic principle of the HCR reaction scheme was used in a different computational context to develop a single-molecule DNA-navigator system. The platform explored all possible paths through a tree graph designed on an origami structure as a simply connected maze without cyclic paths. Such DNA origami structures are information-bearing nanostructures by nature with well-defined nanoscale geometry. The maze could be explored by proximal strand exchange cascade (PSEC) based on hybridization chain reactions. The researchers demonstrated that a system with a large number of single-molecule DNA navigators could collectively conduct parallel depth-first search (PDFS) on the tree to efficiently perform maze solving within 2-D origami. Initially the researchers conducted studies to test the PSEC design. Journal information: Nature Materials Citation: Solving mazes with single-molecule DNA navigators (2018, November 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-mazes-single-molecule-dna.html More information: Jie Chao et al. Solving mazes with single-molecule DNA navigators, Nature Materials (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41563-018-0205-3Renjun Pei et al. Training a molecular automaton to play a game, Nature Nanotechnology (2010). DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2010.194S. M. Douglas et al. A Logic-Gated Nanorobot for Targeted Transport of Molecular Payloads, Science (2012). DOI: 10.1126/science.1214081 Kinetics of the process were investigated at the single-molecule level in the study using time-resolved total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) in a setup with a prescribed starting point (P0) and five intermediate steps (P1-P5). Fluorescence in the setup was quenched using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and the cascade was observed in real time by recording fluorescence signals continuously. The average speed of propagation was recorded to be 2.46 nm per minute, propagation across the straight line (54.4 nm) took approximately 22 minutes. The scientists then constructed the main model maze with 10 vertices that included an entrance vertex A and an exit vertex J, three junctions (B, D, E) an intermediate vertex (I) and four dead ends (C, F, G, H). Each path of the maze that was equivalent to a tree with 10 vertices was investigated using DNA investigators starting at root A. The PSEC reactions produced a mixture of various paths on the maze, confirmed with AFM. Each individual PSEC could progress on one of the five possible paths. Statistical analysis of the length distribution showed that the measured paths coincided well with the values predicted. To prevent the navigators from propagating through a wrong path with dead ends, the scientists designed a streptavidin-biotin tag-based method to selectively eliminate inaccurate path navigation. Only the correct path (PABDIJ) was followed in the maze therefore. The computational context used in the study allowed exploration of paths through tree graphs defined on the origami. The autonomous path explored by the DNA navigators proceeded unidirectionally and irreversibly, turning at junctions and corners on the origami platform as they were designed to. The design enabled parallel depth first search (PDFS) allowing each DNA navigator to individually explore any one of the paths through the given graph at a defined speed, greater than that previously achieved. The main advantage of the described biomolecular computer schemes in comparison to conventional electronic computing is they can be interfaced directly with biologically relevant processes. As a result, the scientists envision translational biomedical sensing and decision-making platforms with DNA origami and single-molecule diagnostics using decision trees. Future applications will also include simple sensors or those coupled to a molecular actuator to trigger downstream molecular cascades. , Nature Nanotechnology Pathfinding operations with DNA navigators make use of a localized strand exchange cascade process initiated at a unique trigger site on the origami platform. Automatic progression along paths is enabled by DNA hairpins containing a universal traversal sequence. By design, each single-molecule navigator can autonomously explore any of the possible paths through a 10-vertex rooted tree constructed in the study. The mazes were equivalent to a tree with an entrance at the root and an exit through one of the leaves. The study conducted by Jie Chao and co-workers resulted in exploring all paths taken by the DNA navigators to extract a specific solution path that connected a given pair of start and end vertices in the maze. As a result, the solution path was laid plainly on the origami platform and illustrated using single-molecule imaging. The approach is now published in Nature Materials, detailing the realization of molecular materials with embedded biomolecular computational functions to operate at the level of the single-molecule with potential to engineer intelligent nanorobots for future applications in industry and medicine.Sophisticated molecular tools were used in the past to create molecular machines that convert chemical, photonic or electric energy into rotary or linear movements at the nanoscale. For instance, Brownian motion at the nanoscale can be controllably converted into directed movements within DNA-based nanomachines using DNA hybridization reactions. Such DNA-based machines operate autonomously by following an embedded ‘molecular program’ pre-designed as a cascade reaction manually triggered via an external stimulus for each step of the operation. The focus of the field has progressively shifted to actualize DNA-based logic circuits using aptamers and DNAzymes to design molecular logic gates. For example, in 2006, Stojanovic and co-workers integrated more than 100 DNA logic gates to engineer an automation calledMAYA-II to play a game of Tic-Tac-Toe. Preceding studies demonstrated an enzyme free computing system based on hybridization chain reactions (HCR) to create logic-gates and logic circuits for more robust and efficient performance than the original systems. Single-molecule DNA navigators for maze-solving. a) Schematic illustration of magnetic bead-based selection. Exit vertex J is labelled with biotin to enable differentiation between the correct and wrong paths. Only if the PSEC reaches the correct exit J, would the biotin-modified T1exit-B strand be released. All wrong paths could be captured and removed by the Streptavidin-modified magmatic beads therefore. b) Details of the release of biotin modification at the exit J by the PSEC. c) AFM characterization of the correct solution after selection. The remaining structures all showed the correct solution path PABDIJ. d) Single-molecule and class-averaged DNA-PAINT characterization of the correct solution after selection. Credit: Nature Materials, doi: 10.1038/s41563-018-0205-3. Explore further The proximal strand exchange cascade (PSEC) system (working principle of the DNA navigator) was facilitated on a rectangular origami substrate made of three components, which included the physical implementation of a tree graph, full strands and an initiator strand. Vacant areas without staple extensions corresponded to walls in the maze, preventing propagation of the strand exchange cascade. The entrance and exit were defined and denoted as ENT and EXIT respectively. In the second component, two types of DNA hairpins, T1 and T2, were used as fuels to drive the PSEC on the tree graph. The two hairpins coexisted metastably in solution to hybridize and fuel the PSEC process with free energy . By design, information only propagated through the network in the presence of an initiator (Initiator I). Upon addition of initiator I, PSEC was conducted and observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To visualize an established formation, the scientists enabled DNA-navigator-based formation of the number 2017 as a proof-of-principle. Another technique known as DNA-PAINT was employed as a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique to reveal molecular features at the nanoscale to further substantiate the PSEC-based path paving process. The on-origami PSEC was highly specific, without intra- or inter-origami crosstalk. The field of intelligent nanorobotics is based on the great promise of molecular devices with information processing capabilities. In a new study that supports the trend of DNA-based information carriers, scientists have engineered a DNA navigator system that can perform single-molecule, parallel, depth-first search operations on a two-dimensional origami platform. Single-molecule characterization of PSEC kinetics. a) A straight line in the middle of the DNA origami was used as the test bed. Vertex P0 is the starting point and vertices P1-P5 are intermediate points. b) Details of the design of six parallel tests to measure the kinetics with time-resolved TIRF. T2 labelled with BHQ2 was used to quench T1 labelled with Cy3, assembling a kinetic profile at each step. The illustrated example shows the mechanism of quenching. c) Example TIRF images show the fluorescence changing with time across the six parallel tests from P0 to P5. d) Typical single-molecule fluorescence traces used to monitor quenching events occurring at vertices P0 to P5. e) Scatter plots showing statistical analysis of the length distribution per path. Credit: Nature Materials, doi: 10.1038/s41563-018-0205-3. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The PSEC-driven graph traversal on a maze. a) A maze design with 10 vertices. Arrows indicate the entrance vertex A and exit vertex J. b) The maze is equivalent to a rooted tree with 10 vertices. The entrance vertex A corresponds to the root of the tree. c) An AFM image showed the result of a transversal experiment generating all possible paths. In this DNA computing implementation of a PDFS algorithm, a vast number of PSEC events simultaneously occurred to realize the graph traversal on the maze. PSEC ending at the exit or deadends were highlighted in red circles. Invalid structures were highlighted with white circles. d) Typical paths found in the mixture seen from left to right. Only PABDIJ was the correct solution to the maze. e) Scatter plots showing the statistical analysis of the length distribution for each path. Credit: Nature Materials, doi: 10.1038/s41563-018-0205-3.last_img read more

2 arrested with fake currency notes in Murshidabad

first_imgKolkata: Murshidabad district police have nabbed two persons and seized Fake Indian Currency Notes (FICN) worth Rs 7 lakh from Farakka.According to police, on Thursday night sleuths got a tip-off that a good number of FICN denominations will be smuggled through Farakka. After a while police came to know from sources that two persons from south India whose whereabouts seemed suspicious were staying in a hotel near New Farakka crossing. Based on the information, on the wee hours of Friday, police raided the room number 33 of the hotel and detained two residents of Chittoor in Andhra Pradesh. During search sleuths found 350 FICN of Rs 2000 denomination. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseImmediately, the duo identified as Raghunand Naidu and Rajesh Dewala was arrested. Later, during interrogation they said that they were acting as a carrier of FICN. A person from Baishnabnagar in Malda had delivered the FICNs to them on Thursday. They were about to leave for Chittoor on Saturday. They also confessed that previously they tried to get hold of FICN but failed to get right contact. Sleuths suspect that a racket in Andhra Pradesh is trying to smuggle in FICN there. The Superintendent of Police (SP) of Murshidabad, Sri Mukesh said: “The rate of FICN is Rs 1 lakh for FICN worth Rs 2 lakh. We are trying to identify the person who came from Malda to deliver the FICNs.” Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAccording to police, last year Murshidabad District Police had nabbed 84 persons and seized FICN worth Rs 1 crore 28 lakh. This year till Friday, 10 persons have been arrested and approximately Rs 10.28 lakh have been seized. Malda for long has a prominent hub for counterfeit currency trade. According to an estimate by Bengal CID, this year, various security agencies have seized counterfeit currencies worth Rs 1.75 crore from across the country and every seizure had the familiar Malda link.last_img read more