南京楼凤

Govt gives Cranes Shs 1billion ahead of crucial World Cup qualifiers

first_imgUganda Cranes vs Ghana Black stars Saturday, 7-10-2017 Mandela National stadium, Namboole.FOOTBALL–The Federation of Uganda Football Association (FUFA) on Wednesday evening received financial support worth Shs1 billion, as part of the government support for the Uganda Cranes’ 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification campaign.This followed a meeting chaired by the Minister of Education and Sports Janet Museveni which was also attended by Minister of State for Sports Charles Bakkabulindi, Permanent Secretary Alex Kakooza and other Ministry officials.FUFA had earlier presented a budget of Shs1.3 billion before the Ghana match and Shs900 million for the post match expenses for the matches against Egypt and Ghana to cover player and coaching allowances, bonuses, air tickets, accommodation, practice match (against Madagascar) plus other related costs and expenses.The FUFA delegation to the meeting included President Eng. Moses Magogo, 1st vice president Justus Mugisha, CEO Edgar Watson and finance director Decolas Kiiza.The First Lady emphasized the importance of Sport and willingness of government to finance excelling national teams and Athletes, according to a statement released by Eng. Magogo.She further appreciated the success registered by FUFA in their recent and past engagements.The First Lady, however, called for long term planning from Sports associations, National Council of Sports (NCS), the Department of Physical Education and the Ministry of Education and Sports so as to avoid late interventions.She also pledged to avail time to meet with sports federations and share experiences for the development of sports in the country.“I am happy government has answered our call for the support to the Uganda Cranes and this cash will help us take care of among others the bonuses and allowances for the players and coaches,” said FUFA president Moses Magogo.“This is the kind of motivation that will influence the sporting results and hopeful we can achieve the desired results.Magogo also thanked the President of Uganda for his continued support for the Cranes and sports in general when ever he has been approached.“I also take this opportunity to thank President Museveni for supporting the Uganda Cranes and other sporting institutions time and time again,” Magogo said.“I also thank everyone in the Ministry of Education and Sports, NCS and others who have ensured that our plea is tended to,” he added.The success of the Uganda Cranes in this campaign is a result of government support. With a Chartered plane to Togo in 2016, the team registered double wins 0-1 and 3-0 to progress to the group stages for the first time. Financial assistance of $200,000 enabled the team to pick a point (goalless draw) from Ghana away in Tamale,” Magogo said.Uganda is hoping to progress to its first ever world cup in Russia 2018 and are second on the log two points behind leaders Egypt with two gamez to play.The Cranes take on Ghana(who arrive on Thursday) at Namboole and then travel to Congo Brazzaville next month.Comments Tags: FUFAGhana Black starsNambooleNational stadiumtopUganda Craneslast_img read more

Red root rot plagued Ohio corn in 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest While there were many great results even after a tough year in 2016, there were some real disappointments too. According to Levi Runkle, a Tri-Ag Products, Inc. agronomist, some of those disappointing corn yields may have been partially the result of a rare issue in Ohio — red root rot. Runkle found the unique challenge for Ohio in a surprising number of fields last year.“This is a rare late season destructive disease that leads to lodging. As we went into harvest we started seeing problems with hybrids that don’t usually have problems with lodging or ear drop,” he said. “As we got to looking at it, we started to see a lot of purpling or red on the roots that looked like insect damage. That is something we typically don’t see here. You see it more in the Delaware or Maryland area.”Red root rot. Photo by Levi Runkle.Red root rot needs the right set of conditions to become a problem.“It is brought on by some type of early stress. For us it could have been from the frost damage last year or an early inoculation of Pythium or Fusarium. As you get into the year, red root rot needs an extended period of stress, which we had with drought stress and higher temperatures,” Runkle said. “Then when we got that large rain event in August, it allowed the inoculant for the red root rot to get in. You can have a really good-looking field and in four or five days it is dead. It completely cannibalizes the stalk and shuts down production and stops packing starch, which really affects grain. We can see 20% yield loss from it. The root mass also decays really fast and your stalk decays fast and it causes a lot of lodging, harvest issues and ear drop. It is really nasty. The higher nighttime temperatures towards the end of August also helped this disease thrive. It is very rare to have all of these things come together in Ohio but it happened last year.”According to the University of Illinois, symptoms of red root rot include red or pink discoloration of the root system and lower stalk tissue, early death and shriveling showing up just prior to corn maturity. The red color is deeper and darker than that of Gibberella stalk and root rot and the symptoms can vary among different corn hybrids. The rotting of the roots below ground can lead to wilting and grayish green foliage, premature plant death, and lodging in four to five days.University of Illinois experts said the Phoma terrestris fungus that causes red root rot is associated with Pythium and Fusarium species and can survive in soils with a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. It overwinters as microsclerotia in soil. High yield conditions and moderate temperatures favor the disease.In many cases Runkle thinks red root rot was a problem in more 2016 fields that people realized because other more common issued were blamed.“Some people thought it was rootworm but in some cases in Ohio last year it was red root rot,” he said. “Kernels didn’t fill right because the plant died prematurely.”Runkle does not think red root rot will be a regular problem in Ohio due to the conditions it requires.“Hopefully we don’t see it again for a long time. It does stay in the soil, but you still have to have those other factors for it to be a problem. You have to have a lot of things line up to get this problem,” he said. “I don’t think it will be a regular problem in Ohio.”last_img read more

Urban Heat: Can White Roofs Help Cool World’s Warming Cities?

first_imgThis post originally appeared at Yale Environment 360. Summers in the city can be extremely hot — several degrees hotter than in the surrounding countryside. But recent research indicates that it may not have to be that way. The systematic replacement of dark surfaces with white could lower heat wave maximum temperatures by 2° Celsius or more. And with climate change and continued urbanization set to intensify “urban heat islands,” the case for such aggressive local geoengineering to maintain our cool grows.The meteorological phenomenon of the urban heat island has been well known since giant cities began to emerge in the 19th century. The materials that comprise most city buildings and roads reflect much less solar radiation — and absorb more — than the vegetation they have replaced. They radiate some of that energy in the form of heat into the surrounding air.The darker the surface, the more the heating. Fresh asphalt reflects only 4% of sunlight compared to as much as 25% for natural grassland and up to 90% for a white surface such as fresh snow.Most of the roughly 2% of the earth’s land surface covered in urban development suffers from some level of urban heating. New York City averages 1-3° C warmer than the surrounding countryside, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — and as much as 12° warmer during some evenings. The effect is so pervasive that some climate skeptics have seriously claimed that global warming is merely an illusion created by thousands of once-rural meteorological stations becoming surrounded by urban development. Climate change researchers adjust for such measurement bias, so that claim does not stand up. Nonetheless, the effect is real and pervasive. So, argues a recent study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, if dark heat-absorbing surfaces are warming our cities, why not negate the effect by installing white roofs and other light-colored surfaces to reflect back the sun’s rays? Cool Roofs Cut Urban Water ConsumptionJunk Science and the Heat-Island EffectDo Green Roofs Temper Urban Heat?Los Angeles Lightens Streets in Bid to Stay CoolDenver’s Green Roof Ordinance Kicks In Rural areas also could benefitBut it may not just be urban areas that could benefit from a whitewashing. Seneviratne and her team proposed that farmers could cool rural areas, too, by altering farming methods. Different methods might work in different regions with different farming systems. And while the percentage changes in reflectivity that are possible might be less than in urban settings, if applied over large areas, she argues that they could have significant effects.Los Angeles has coated several streets in a light gray paint to reduce road-top temperatures by as much as 10 Fahrenheit. (Los Angeles Bureau of Street Services)In Europe, grain fields are almost always plowed soon after harvesting, leaving a dark surface of soil to absorb the sun’s rays throughout the winter. But if the land remained unplowed, the lightly colored stubble left on the fields after harvesting would reflect about 30% percent of sunlight, compared to only 20% from a cleared field. It sounds like a relatively trivial difference, but over large areas of cropland this could reduce temperatures in some rural areas on sunny days by as much as 2° C, Seneviratne’s colleague Edouard Davin has calculated.In North America, early plowing is much less common. But Peter Irvine, a climate and geoengineering researcher at Harvard University, has suggested that crops themselves could be chosen for their ability to reflect sunlight. For instance, in Europe, a grain like barley, which reflects 23% of sunlight, could be replaced by sugar beet, an economically comparable crop, which reflects 26%. Sometimes, farmers could simply choose more reflective varieties of their preferred crops.Again, the difference sounds marginal. But since croplands cover more than 10% of the earth’s land surface, roughly five times more than urban areas, the potential may be considerable. RELATED ARTICLES Cooler temperatures could save livesDuring summer heat waves, when the sun beats down from unclouded skies, the creation of lighter land surfaces “could help to lower extreme temperatures… by up to 2° or 3° Celsius” in much of Europe, North America, and Asia, says Sonia Seneviratne, who studies land-climate dynamics at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, and is co-author of the new study. It could save lives, she argues, and the hotter it becomes, the stronger the effect.Seneviratne is not alone in making the case for boosting reflectivity. There are many small-scale initiatives in cities to make roof surfaces more reflective. New York, for instance, introduced rules on white roofs into its building codes as long ago as 2012. Volunteers have taken white paint to nearly 7 million square feet of tar roofs in the city, though that is still only about 1% of the potential roof area.Chicago is trying something similar, and last year Los Angeles began a program to paint asphalt road surfaces with light gray paint. Outside the United States, cool-roof initiatives in cities such as Melbourne, Australia, are largely limited to encouraging owners to cool individual buildings for the benefit of their occupants, rather than trying to cool cities or neighborhoods.The evidence of such small-scale programs remains anecdotal. But now studies around the world are accumulating evidence that the benefits of turning those 1 percents into 100 percents could be transformative and could save many lives every year.Keith Oleson of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado looked at what might happen if every roof in large cities around the world were painted white, raising their reflectivity — known to climate scientists as albedo — from a typical 32% today to 90%. He found that it would decrease the urban heat island effect by a third — enough to reduce the maximum daytime temperatures by an average of 0.6° C, and more in hot sunny regions such as the Arabian Peninsula and Brazil.Other studies suggest even greater benefits in the U.S. In a 2014 paper, Matei Georgescu of Arizona State University found that “cool roofs” could cut temperatures by up to 1.5° C in California and 1.8° in cities such as Washington, D.C. Urban heat can be a killerThe urban heat island can be a killer. Counter-intuitively, the biggest effects are often at night. Vulnerable people such as the old who are stressed by heat during the day badly need the chance to cool down at night. Without that chance, they can succumb to heat stroke and dehydration.New research underlines that temperature peaks can cause a spike in heart attacks. This appears to be what happened during the great European heat wave of 2003, during which some 70,000 people died, mostly in homes without air conditioning. Doctors said the killer was not so much the 40° C daytime temperatures (104° F), but the fact that nights stayed at or above 30° (86° F).Such urban nightmares are likely to happen ever more frequently in the future, both because of the expansion of urban areas and because of climate change.Predicted urban expansion in the U.S. this century “can be expected to raise near-surface temperatures 1-2° C… over large regional swathes of the country,” according to Georgescu’s 2014 paper. Similar threats face other fast-urbanizing parts of the world, including China, India, and Africa, which is expected to increase its urban land area six-fold from 1970 to 2030, “potentially exposing highly vulnerable populations to land use-driven climate change.”Several studies suggest that climate change could itself crank up the urban heat island effect. Richard Betts at Britain’s Met Office Hadley Centre forecasts that it will increase the difference between urban and rural temperatures by up to 30% in some places, notably in the Middle East and South Asia, where deaths during heat waves are already widespread.A combination of rising temperatures and high humidity is already predicted to make parts of the Persian Gulf region the first in the world to become uninhabitable due to climate change. And a study published in February predicted temperatures as much as 10° C hotter in most European cities by century’s end.No wonder the calls to cool cities are growing. Unintended consequencesOn the face of it, such initiatives make good sense as countries struggle to cope with the impacts of climate change. But there are concerns that if large parts of the world adopted such policies to relieve local heat waves, there could be noticeable and perhaps disagreeable impacts on temperature and rainfall in adjacent regions. Sometimes the engineers would only be returning reflectivity to the conditions before urbanization, but even so, it could end up looking like back-door geoengineering.Proponents of local projects such as suppressing urban heat islands say they are only trying to reverse past impacts of inadvertent geoengineering through urbanization and the spread of croplands. Moreover, they argue that local engineering will have only local effects. “If all French farmers were to stop plowing up their fields in summer, the impact on temperatures in Germany would be negligible,” Seneviratne says.“Local radiative management differs from global geoengineering in that it does not aim at effecting global temperatures [and] global effects would be negligible,” she says. “It is “a measure of adaptation.”But things might not always be quite so simple. Reducing local temperatures would, for instance, limit evaporation, and so potentially could reduce rainfall downwind. A modeling study by Irvine found that messing with the reflectivity of larger areas such as deserts could cause a “large reduction in the intensity of the Indian and African monsoons in particular.” But the same study concluded that changing albedo in cities or on farmland would be unlikely to have significant wider effects.What is clear is that tackling urban heat islands by increasing reflectivity would not be enough to ward off climate change. Oleson found that even if every city building roof and stretch of urban pavement in the world were painted white, it would only delay global warming by 11 years. But its potential value in ameliorating the most severe consequences of excess heat in cities could be life-saving. The green and PV optionsAnother option is not to whitewash roofs, but to green them with foliage. This is already being adopted in many cities. In 2016, San Francisco became the first American city to make green roofs compulsory on some new buildings. New York last year announced a $100-million program for cooling neighborhoods with trees. So which is better, a white roof or a “green” roof?Evidence here is fragmentary. But Georgescu found a bigger direct cooling effect from white roofs. Vincenzo Costanzo, now of the University of Reading in England, has reached a similar conclusion for Italian cities. But green roofs may have other benefits. A study in Adelaide, Australia, found that besides delivering cooling in summer, they also act as an insulating layer to keep buildings warmer in winter.There is a third option competing for roof space to take the heat out of cities — covering them in photovoltaic cells. PV cells are dark, and so do not reflect much solar radiation into space. But that is because their business is to capture that energy and convert it into low-carbon electricity.Solar panels “cool daytime temperatures in a way similar to increasing albedo via white roofs,” according to a study by scientists at the University of New South Wales. The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports last year, found that in a city like Sydney, Australia, a city-wide array of solar panels could reduce summer maximum temperatures by up to 1° C.That is the theory, but there are concerns about whether it will always work in practice. Studies into the impact on local temperatures of large solar farms in deserts have produced some contradictory findings. For while they prevent solar rays from reaching the desert surface, they also act as an insulating blanket at night, preventing the desert sands from losing heat. The net warming effect has been dubbed a “solar heat island.”The lesson then is that light, reflective surfaces can have a dramatic impact in cooling the surrounding air — in cities, but in the countryside too. Whitewashed walls, arrays of photovoltaic cells, and stubble-filled fields can all provide local relief during the sweltering decades ahead. But policymakers beware. It doesn’t always work like that. There can be unintended consequences, both on temperature and other aspects of climate, like rainfall. Even local geoengineering needs to be handled with care. Fred Pearce is a freelance author and journalist based in the U.K. He is a contributing writer for Yale Environment 360.last_img read more

7 Useful Ctrl and Cmd Key Shortcuts in Adobe After Effects

first_imgPaired with the next shortcut, this is a great tip for cycling through a project. Instead of clicking and dragging layers everywhere, use this shortcut to move any layer through your composition.5. Switch Between LayersWindows: Ctrl + ↑ or ↓Mac: Cmd + ↑ or ↓ Constantly using the mouse in After Effects can become annoying. Use these handy shortcuts instead to speed through your next project.After Effects is a powerful creative tool that many people find intimidating. But, as you work more with the software, you’ll realize the value of keyboard shortcutsHere are 7 handy ctrl/cmd key shortcuts that will save you time and ease your workflow.1. Paste Layer at Current TimeWindows: Ctrl + Alt + VMac: Cmd + Option + V Looking for more After Effects tips and tricks? Check these out.Tutorial: Getting Started with Content-Aware Fill in After EffectsAdobe Releases New Content Aware Fill Tool for After Effects5 Ways to Animate with Trim Paths in Adobe After EffectsHow to Create a Mid-’90s DV Camcorder Look in After EffectsHow to Export with Transparency from Adobe After Effects When you normally copy and paste a layer, it’s positioned at the beginning of the composition. With this shortcut, the position of the time indicator will determine the paste location.2. Fit Layer to CompWindows Ctrl + Alt + FMac: Cmd + Option + F Finally, this is a quick way to lock or unlock any clip. If you have a large project with a number of layers you want left alone, highlight them all and use this shortcut to make sure they stay untouched.Learning all of these will take some getting used to, but not only will they improve your workflow, they’ll also free you up to think creatively.Need an easy way to reference these shortcuts? Here’s a roundup of all the shortcuts and their keys. When I’m working in After Effects, I always run into the problem of clicking a layer and accidentally moving it. This shortcut allows you to cycle through every layer and find what you’re looking for. Once you find it, use the previous shortcut to move it up or down among the other layers.6. Scrubbing Through the TimelineWindows: Ctrl + ← or →Mac: Cmd + ← or → This one is huge for me — I use it all the time. When I’m doing any frame-by-frame animation, I use this shortcut to make it more efficient (instead of scrubbing through with the mouse). Constantly going through the timeline and reaching for the mouse every other second gets old fast. This shortcut is, by far, my personal favorite.7. Lock and Unlock LayersTo LockWindows: Ctrl + L Mac: Cmd + LTo UnlockWindows: Ctrl + Shift + LMac: Cmd + Shift + L Staying organized is important when working in After Effects. Within some shape layers, you’ll have multiple groups that you can pair together. This shortcut is a great way to make sure you keep your project clean and efficient.4. Move a Specific Layer Backward/ForwardWindows: Ctrl + [ or ]Mac: Cmd + Option + ↑ or ↓ The old way to fit a layer to comp was to open up the layer, go to scale, and edit the parameters so it would fill the screen. However, with this shortcut, you can instantly fit any layer to the composition (within a few seconds) without any transform properties.3. Group and Ungroup ShapesGroupWindows: Ctrl + G Mac: Cmd + G |UngroupWindows: Ctrl + Shift + GMac: Cmd + Shift + Glast_img read more

a month agoChelsea legend Drogba: Abraham no surprise to me

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea legend Drogba: Abraham no surprise to meby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea legend Didier Drogba is happy seeing Tammy Abraham succeeding this season.Abraham has scored seven goals in five Premier League games at the beginning of the campaign.”Yeah, I’ve known him [Abraham] since he’s been like this,” Drogba explained.”These are kids we used to see, they used to come and watch us training, and I believe they learned a little bit of our skills, how we read the game. So, you know, we’re not surprised because I also trained with them when I used to train with the reserve team.”It was always a moment for me to give away some skills, some knowledge, and they learnt really fast, really quick.”So once again, I’m not surprised with what I’ve seen [with Abraham].” last_img read more