2019上海龙凤419

New Yorkers Want To Call W 8th St Jimi Hendrix Way

first_img Email Facebook Changing West Eighth St. To “Jimi Hendrix Way” new-yorkers-want-call-w-8th-st-jimi-hendrix-way News New Yorkers Want To Call W. 8th St. “Jimi Hendrix Way” Twitter Greenwich Village, N.Y., home of Electric Lady Studios hopes the city will dub their neighborhood with the guitarist’s legendary namePhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Oct 5, 2017 – 4:29 pm The life and art of Jimi Hendrix are touchstones that artists and fans revisit, for example Outkast’s André 3000 playing him in the 2013 biopic Jimi: All Is By My Side. Now residents and merchants on W. 8th Street in New York City’s Greenwich Village hope co-naming their street “Jimi Hendrix Way” will have the same effect on tourists and foot traffic.Comparable to the 1977 renaming of a portion of W 106th Street as Duke Ellington Boulevard by the Riverside Drive home where he composed, these Greenwich Villagers want to memorialize the magic of Electric Lady Studios, which Hendrix bought in 1968 and opened in 1970, the year of his death.Local merchant Richard Geist said, “We want to bring that magic back.”The co-naming process is still at the stage of collecting petition signatures, after which the next steps are community board support followed by a full vote of the New York City Council.The Making Of Jimi Hendrix’s Are You Experienced?last_img read more

Oculus cofounders exit is latest in string of Facebook departures

first_img Tags Post a comment Mitchell was the head of virtual reality products at Facebook, which purchased Oculus for $3 billion. The Oculus team at Facebook has grappled with a number of woes, including a lawsuit and executive turnover, as it tries to make virtual reality more mainstream. Facebook bought Oculus because it envisions a future in which Facebookers will be able to share moments with their friends and family as if they’re all together in person. Co-founders at other companies Facebook purchased have also left the social media giant in recent years. That list includes Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger, WhatApp’s Brian Acton and Jan Koum and Oculus co-founder Palmer Luckey. The Instagram co-founders reportedly clashed with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.Mitchell said he’ll be spending time with family and taking time to travel. His departure also comes before Oculus Connect 6, a virtual reality developer conference that kicks off in San Jose, California, at the end of September. Oculus co-founder Nate Mitchell James Martin/CNET Facebook can’t seem to hold onto the founders of the companies it acquires.The latest departure: Nate Mitchell, co-founder of the virtual reality startup Oculus, which launched in 2012 and was bought by Facebook in 2014. Mitchell, the last Oculus co-founder still at Facebook, said Tuesday that he was stepping down.”Virtual reality is still on the bleeding edge of technology, and this community continues to pioneer the way forward,” he wrote in a post on Reddit. “What’s ahead is always unknown, and that’s what makes it exciting.” Some bittersweet news to share. After 7 incredible years at Oculus / Facebook, I’m moving on. It’s been a privilege to be a part of the VR community, and I can’t wait to see what comes next: https://t.co/M3XWASigvS pic.twitter.com/dhzPrdmpuP— Nate Mitchell (@natemitchell) August 13, 2019 0 Sci-Tech Tech Industry Share your voice Oculus Facebooklast_img read more

Why Are There Confederate Statues in the District

first_imgDespite efforts across the region to remove both vestiges of Confederate history and polarizing U.S. figures memorialized in public spaces, the District remains home to several, including a highly controversial statue of Brig. Gen. Albert Pike situated at Judiciary Square – between D.C. Courthouses and the Labor Department.  And while hidden in plain view, even “conscious” Blacks seem largely unfazed by the towering figure as they enjoy meals and lunch-time strolls around the grounds.The statue of Brigadier General Albert Pike, a Confederate and Klansman, sits near the Judiciary Square metro station, and remains overlooked by many Blacks in the area.(Photo by Shantella Y. Sherman)The six-foot, 300-pound Pike, according to his Smithsonian Associates biography, not only gained notoriety as a teacher, journalist, Brig. Gen. during the Confederacy, and U.S.-Native American treaty negotiator, but also as a Klansman, who has been credited with creating the rituals of the Ku Klux Klan for its founder Nathan Bedford Forest.“It’s ironic that in a city that was once majority African-American and which is still home to some of the most justice-minded residents, a constant stream of people of all races sit around this statue and eat, talk, and socialize,” Edith Grey-Scott, a Ward 7 resident and long-time Judiciary Square vendor told the AFRO.  “There have been protests in the past to have the monument to Pike removed, but the passion for the fight waned.”While Pike is the only Confederate Civil War general memorialized in D.C., calls for its removal began in 1991 – with the D.C. Council unable to reach a decision about its razing.  Weekly protests by Lyndon LaRouche, a political activist, continued through 1992, but eventually ended.The statue was erected in 1901, some 10 years following Pike’s death, by fellow Freemasons, who considered his efforts on behalf of their organization both significant and valiant.Congress Heights resident Carlos Payton, who walks the path surrounding Pike’s statue during his lunch breaks, said he never paid much attention to the figure – assuming it honored someone of importance to the history of the District or the courthouses.  Upon learning of Pike’s connections to the Confederacy and the Klan, Payton was taken aback.“That’s unreal.  All these Black people around here and this racist guy is peering down at us as we go about our day… I guess we need to get the statue removed, but also learn a lot more about the history of these parks and monuments surrounding us,” Payton told the AFRO.  “We’ve got our children fighting in the streets for Black Lives Matter, and the whole time, as parents, we’re working around monuments to people who initiated some of these plans to oppress us.”In addition to Pike’s statue, the National Statuary Hall Collection housed on U.S.Capitol grounds, contain 13 statues of Confederate figures, including Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, and Edmund Kirby Smith.last_img read more