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Lebanese in impoverished north protest virus lockdown

first_imgBEIRUT (AP) — Dozens of Lebanese protesters, enraged at a nearly month-long lockdown to combat the spread of coronavirus, took to the streets of the country’s second largest city pelting security forces with stones. The protest that continued into the night Monday prompted tear gas from the security forces and the eventual deployment of army troops to break up the gathering. The protesters gathered in central Tripoli despite a strict lockdown in place since mid January aimed at containing a major surge in infection in the small Mediterranean country.  Tripoli residents say their impoverished region can’t cope with a continued lockdown to contain coronavirus, which comes amid an unprecedented economic meltdown in the small Mediterranean country.last_img

TWO CHAPELS TO BE OPENED AT LETTERKENNY HOSPITAL

first_imgTWO chapels – one Catholic and one non-Catholic – are to be opened at Letterkenny hospital.Following ongoing speculation regarding the plans for a Catholic Chapel at Letterkenny General Hospital, members of the Chaplaincy Team (Fr Martin Chambers, RC Chaplain; Ms. Kathleen Doherty, HSE Lay Chaplain; Rev Stewart Wright, COI Chaplain) met today and have issued the following statement:The Chaplaincy Team at Letterkenny General Hospital are delighted to confirm that in the spirit of Christian Unity all denominations will be fully accommodated in the new arrangements for public and private worship in the chapels which are to be created at the hospital. They have outlined that they feel positive about the new facilities and are hopeful that they will now be able to meet the spiritual needs of staff, patients and their families more effectively than they ever did before. The Chaplaincy Team have explained that these new arrangements will include a Catholic Chapel in which the Blessed Sacrament will be present and which will feature the symbols of Catholic faith such as a Tabernacle, Stations of the cross and statues which will be permanently displayed. There will also be an Ecumenical Chapel to cater for other Christian denominations including Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist Churches. A chaplain’s office and a quiet room for counselling will also be included. Currently members of the Muslim faith have access to a corridor in St Conal’s Hospital for Friday prayers and this arrangement will continue.The Team hope that this clarification will put an end to the unhelpful speculation and misinformation which has been in circulation and has been deeply upsetting for both them and those they minister to. They wish to acknowledge the trauma and distress which was caused to the entire community by the flood at the hospital which resulted in there being no designated area to worship and the Team being displaced so they had to struggle in difficult circumstances to minister to the needs of those under their care.The Chaplaincy Team have, however, been actively engaged in negotiations with hospital management and the design team to ensure that the difficulties which they have been encountered resulted in a positive outcome for all those who wish to worship and have their spiritual needs met within the hospital. They are confident that this partnership approach, has successfully achieved improved and enhanced facilities which will cater for all denominations. They have worked together to represent the views of the entire spiritual community who use the hospital which has been both challenging and rewarding. In doing so they have created accommodation which is superior in design and layout to what existed previously and which respect and honours the spiritual needs of all.The Chaplaincy Team are presently engaged in finalising the proposed layout of the new chapels. They look forward to welcoming all those they minister to in the coming months and they will continue to work to represent and meet their needs now and in the future.  TWO CHAPELS TO BE OPENED AT LETTERKENNY HOSPITAL was last modified: February 17th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:catholic chapelletterkenny hospitallast_img read more

March of the “Selfish Darwinians”?

first_imgPenguins: are they moral models, or evolutionary examples?  Ever since last year’s surprise blockbuster documentary March of the Penguins, the well-dressed seabirds and their harsh lives have provoked empathy and commentary.  Marlene Zuk (UC Riverside) took issue in Nature1 with those who try to moralize about monogamy from taking their cues only from the movie.  She pointed to instances of apparent homosexual behavior and mate-swapping, to say nothing of the variety of sexual antics in the animal kingdom.  Launching into moral lessons of her own, Zuk demonstrated what radically different lessons one can take from observations of nature:Tom Turnipseed, writing for the website Zmag.org, suggested that the real message lies in the penguins’ “cooperating with one another and sacrificing their own lives and individual gain for the common good and survival of their own kind” – behaviour that executives at Enron, the US energy company involved in an infamous corruption scandal, should have emulated.  Other reviews also allude to this supposedly altruistic behaviour and the “inexplicable love” shown.    Were we watching the same film?  In fact, the penguins are perfect little darwinians, selfish as can be.  No one seemed to question why the birds took such pains on their return to the breeding grounds to find their own mate, their own chick, in a crowd of thousands of look-alikes.  It seemed human, after all, like sailors returning from war eagerly seeking their families among the throng on shore.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)So what is the darwinian explanation for this behavior?  Zuk anticipates one objection, then brings evolution to the rescue, ending on a moral lesson of her own:But if the penguins simply needed to save the species, surely any chick would do, and feeding the nearest hungry beak would save all that tramping through the snow searching for one’s special little one.  Why bother?  Evolution supplies the answer: only scrupulous discrimination of your own kin will perpetuate one’s genes.  How the penguins manage such sophisticated feats is a fascinating area of study, one that will yield much more than a consideration of whether they are good role models for monogamy.    If we use animals as poster children for ideology, we not only end up in meaningless arguments over whose examples are more significant (cannibalistic mantids or promiscuous bonobos?), we risk losing sight of what is truly interesting and important about their behaviour.  What the executives at Enron are supposed to learn is another story.1Marlene Zuk, “Family values in black and white,” Nature 439, 917 (23 February 2006) | doi:10.1038/439917a.This article provides a case study on the self-refuting nature of Darwinian explanations.  The commentary that follows is not going to defend anthropomorphism and moralizing from animals – Zuk is right that you could pick and choose between extremes and find any moral lesson you want out there in the wild.  According to the Judeo-Christian tradition, morality requires a rational mind and personhood.  A knowledgeable theologian would not make the mistake of attributing penguin behavior to rational moral choice and forethought.  Object lessons from penguin behavior might prove useful as pedagogical aids, as long as one does not really believe the birds are rationally choosing moral actions.  The intelligent design perspective would be that animals operate according to internal programs designed to preserve the species in a dynamic environment.  But how can Zuk, on the other extreme, claim that the emperor penguins are “perfect little darwinians, selfish as can be?”  Her explanation might sound reasonable to a high-school biology student, but is unworthy of scholarly readers of Nature, because a careful look reveals that it falls into the same anthropomorphic, moralizing trap.  Worse, it overlooks the most important aspects of the march of the penguins that need explaining.    Zuk tried to pre-empt the objection that “any chick would do,” so let’s consider her answer.  Why wouldn’t any chick do?  Within a strictly Darwinian picture of the scene, the objection she sweeps away so dismissively seems valid.  Why would natural selection go to the extra cost of evolving strict pair-bonding?  That would require heritable genetic mutations leading to accurate discrimination of specific calls from one mate out of thousands, and behaviors that defer compensation till the correct mate is found.  Let’s call one pair Homer and Marge, and their little chick Maggie.  Wouldn’t it make much more sense in evolutionary terms for Marge to go direct to the fittest-looking chick in the crowd?  Suppose Marge finds Homer, only to see that little Maggie is a sickly, scrawny youngster not likely to last long in the struggle for life.  If evolutionists talk about “mate choice” and “choosy females” as part of the process of passing on one’s genes, then certainly we can ask about “chick choice.”  It seems that would make even better sense in a Darwinian world, where the individual doesn’t really matter in the long run.  The fittest chick is going to be the one most likely to carry on the genes of the population.  Why wouldn’t penguins evolve toward a behavior where all the chicks go running out to the mothers, and the fastest ones get the food?  By this time Homer’s work is done.  He may not even link up with Marge next season.  If a male is needed for another month of rearing, any of the nearly identical tuxedo-attired dudes could do the job.    The only way Zuk could claim her answer is better is to violate a Darwinian principle and commit a logical fallacy.  She has to admit to a moral standard and commit anthropomorphism, the very errors she set out to debunk.  The moral standard, perverse though it is, is that individual selfishness is good.  Notice her words, “perfect little darwinians, selfish as can be.”  By implication, selfishness is a good thing because it contributes to survival and the passing on of one’s genes.  But that begs the question of why these are good values.  The logical fallacy is to imagine that penguins can be selfish, or exercise enough forethought and self-control against the severe rigors of their harsh environment to decide, in penguin-English, “If I can just manage to hold on against these hardships, I will be rewarded by passing on my genes.”  If penguins cannot care about monogamy, they cannot care about what happens to their genes.  If nobody cares, though, then the cheaper way for evolution to keep the penguin population booming is to reward the top contenders; line up the 90th percentile of fittest chicks with the females that have the most food, and let the rest die off, regardless of who the parents are.    Zuk completely ignored a more serious problem.  She only addressed the individual pair-bonding behavior, not the origin of the penguins themselves (see also 11/10/2005 and 10/27/2005 entries).  How did the bones, wings, scuba gear, ears, eyes, waterproof coat, muscles and tendons, and organ systems evolve?  She assumes that we will accept the Darwinian mechanism for all the wonders of nature just because she can concoct a story about how selfish genes produced individual pair bonding.  This is so typical of evolutionists.  They seize the gnat and claim ownership of the camel.  Finding one customer willing to say he feels better after taking Darwin’s Finest Natural Selection Snake Oil, they advertise it to the world as the panacea for the universe.  Also, she herself points to the fact that sexual behaviors in the animal kingdom are extremely diverse.  If Darwin fulfilled the Newtonian Dream of finding a natural law for biology, how can it explain opposites?  Where are his equations?  Why would not Darwin’s mechanism steer all populations toward uniform behaviors, instead of producing cannibalism among mantids, promiscuity among bonobos, and monogamy among birds?  By explaining everything, it explains nothing.  Evolutionary theory does not predict the behavior observed among emperor penguins, but only tries to attach a story to it after the fact.  The Darwin Party has replaced the science lab with a storytelling pub for lazy scientists (see 12/22/2003 commentary).    A nice film like March of the Penguins may stir our hearts, but whether or not penguins make good role models for humans is completely beside the point.  Darwinism fails to account for the origin of all living things, not just penguins.  Evolutionary explanations are speculative, anthropomorphic, and inadequate.  By moralizing herself in a somewhat haughty tone, Zuk has only reinforced the reality that humans care about right and wrong.    As for the penguins, they are getting pretty tired of all this evolutionary speculating, too.  See Eco Inquirer for the story….(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Corruption in Big Science Exposed

first_imgA commentator chastises scientists and their leaders for contributing to the destruction of the civilization that nourishes them.Colin Macilwain, a commentator for Nature, is of a rare breed willing to expose the biases of his bosses. He attended the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) last month and had a great time. The sessions were stimulating, the fellowship was great, and lots of good ideas were shared about “how to engage the public,” the theme of the meeting.The only trouble was what was going on outside the hotel — in the United States and the world at large.In fact, the AAAS meeting took place in a sort of semi-conscious never-never land. The science-policy crowd talked a great game even as the pillars of the republic crashed noisily down around their heads.And thus he launches into a sermon to fellow scientists about their role in current events. His opinions about Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz or France’s “far-right politician Marine Le Pen” are, as could be expected, along a liberal line, but that’s not as important as his opinion about his scientific colleagues. In their “semi-conscious ever-never land” bubble, his colleagues at the AAAS meeting were oblivious to the role their own institutions have played in worrisome trends Macilwain sees as threatening western civilization. Supporters of Trump, Cruz and Sanders, he notes, were not involved in the discussions.They never are. Senior scientists are instead inextricably linked to the centrist, free-market political establishment that has tended to rule, but which is now falling dangerously from public favour.Whether his assessment of blame is on target or not, Macilwain is more upset with Big Science. Western civilization is on the rocks, falling like Rome, and all scientists want to do is keep returning to the government for money to support their own interests.Many laboratory researchers perceive this, I fear, to be someone else’s problem. But it isn’t. If the West is really in its decline-and-fall stage, its Caligula stage, its Donald Trump stage, then this isn’t just an issue for political and financial elites. It’s also a problem for the ‘experts’ who crawl around after these elites, massaging their egos and defending their interests.Trump supporters will certainly be outraged at being associated with Caligula! Nevertheless, Macilwain doesn’t care so much whether it is Trump or Sanders who is at fault. Scientists are the ones who need repentance. They pretend to be above it all, but they are as guilty as everyone, thinking themselves impartial and above the fray.The problem extends down into the community itself. We like to talk about ‘engaging the public’, but many scientists really just want to talk at them. And too many ordinary scientists hold politicians in utter intellectual contempt — even though it is the scientists who have chosen a career that allows them to pursue relatively simple problems (such as building a machine to detect gravitational waves) rather than genuinely difficult ones (such as running a social-care programme in a small town).And those senior scientists who do engage with the government or public — as scientific advisers, for example — often take up highly political positions without acknowledging that they are doing so. For example, they support free-trade agreements that cede the right of democratic governments to control things such as cigarette advertising or pesticide use without hard, scientific evidence. This is a political position that is pursued with great dedication by global corporations — and that is haplessly bought into by many scientists without a thought for its consequences.His hyperbole should hit a nerve. What? Detecting gravitational waves is simpler than running a social care program? Doesn’t Colin know how expensive the detector was, and how many years of work that took? His point sinks in on reflection. Real people outside the walls of establishment science are facing real-life problems that are difficult for them. They couldn’t care less about gravitational waves. Yet scientists proudly “talk at them” about reality, pretending to know what’s important. As elitists, they fail to recognize or acknowledge their own political biases.Some individual scientists or groups of scientists are counteracting the isolationist trend that is hastening the collapse, he notes.But at the top, there is paralysis: leading scientific organizations do little except chase money and reinforce the ruling nexus of politics and finance — even since the financial crisis of 2008, which discredited the free-market philosophy that underpins that nexus. I argued years ago (see Nature 479, 447; 2011) that scientific leaders had failed to respond in any meaningful way to that collapse, and I’m still waiting.The political structure of the West is in deep trouble, and should it fall apart, there will be plenty of blame to go around. Most will go to political and financial elites, or to rowdy mobs. But some will belong to people in the middle who have taken public funds, defended elites and then stood back and watched as democracy got ridden over a cliff.Macilwain is sketchy about his political and economic philosophy. At one point he seems to say that free markets undergird science; here he seems to say the collapse of 2008 discredited the free-market philosophy. It appears he’s portraying an unholy alliance between politics and finance (i.e., big banks). In that case, scientists have been co-conspirators. They take public funds and defend the very elites who collapsed the market and have wrested political power from the hands of citizens. What matters for science is a stable society. You can’t have that in a collapsed civilization run by mobs or by Caligulas.Update 3/17/16: See Wesley J. Smith’s take on Macilwain’s editorial at Evolution News & Views.If you are a conservative, don’t be overly distracted by Macilwain’s mischaracterization of America’s conservative candidates who repeatedly, vociferously advocate for free markets, prosperity and the rule of law (including the end of “crony capitalism” and other forms of corruption). What’s valuable in his editorial is his rare willingness to criticize Big Science. Scientists pretend to want to “engage the public” but the dialogue is all one way. They hold politicians in utter contempt, but run to them for money. They defend elites but fail to recognize their own elitist attitudes.Macilwain, a Brit, was able to state this about the Americans. But we wonder if the Editors of Nature felt he was hitting a little close to home. He was, after all, speaking about western civilization, not just American civilization.  We hope his job is safe; scientists need his voice to shatter their illusions of self-righteousness and intellectual superiority.Still, key factors were missing from his editorial. His country has become utterly secularized. What does that do to the Protestant work ethic that undergirds a market economy? His country has been invaded by Muslim immigrants, many of whom hold western civilization in contempt and prefer a Sharia dictatorship worse than any Rome under Caligula. And while many European countries are retreating from socialism, an America under avowed socialist Bernie Sanders would run up a debt and deficit so rapidly on entitlements, it would quickly dry up scientific funding. Maybe he should think again about those “right wing” candidates and listen to what they really believe about the Constitution, liberty, and free markets. Neither a bankrupt economy nor a dictatorial regime is likely to provide a safe place for science to flourish.We’re not endorsing a candidate in the lively American political scene going on now. We would only like to remind those readers who fear God that the Apostle Paul instructed Timothy to instruct his church: “First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity. This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” (I Timothy 2:1-4). A civilization conducive to a “tranquil and quiet life” is good not only for Christ followers, but also for scientists and for social workers in small towns. And need we remind everyone that knowledge of the truth (a goal of science) presupposes a standard of truth that secularism cannot provide? If truth evolves, it’s not the truth. Scientists need to ponder the origin of truth.(Visited 62 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africans come to the aid of refugees

first_img14 July 2015The KwaZulu-Natal family who opened their farm to 143 displaced foreigners last week has thanked the South Africans who heeded their call for assistance.“A farmer from Gauteng heard about this and drove all the way down with a bakkie full of potatoes. He didn’t even know our address, he just stopped in Cato Ridge and asked about us. How awesome is that?” said Rae Wartnaby, 47.“There was another lady who came and spoke to one of the refugees who stands at the gate and she discovered that his passion is playing guitar. She left and came back with a guitar for him.“People have been really awesome,” said Wartnaby, who together with her husband Andrew, 47, opened their Hope Farm in Killarney Valley to people left destitute by xenophobic attacks.The couple said they had taken in the displaced foreigners because they had heard the eThekwini Municipality had closed down the last remaining xenophobia camp in Chatsworth.A place of refugeShocked that the families had been arrested for illegally occupying the camp, and children separated from their parents, the Wartnabys offered their home to the refugees. The families, most of whom are from Democratic Republic of Congo and Burundi, said they did not want to live in South Africa anymore because of the xenophobic violence.On Friday, the family and their guests met lawyers and mediators. “The team have started taking down everybody’s story. So everybody has, or will get, a chance to speak to mediators.”Wartnaby said the United Nations did not visit her home on Friday, as had been anticipated.Shelter and medical careHer husband said he hoped this story showed that South Africans did care.“People have been coming here to spend time to get to know the foreigners and find out some of the stories. We and our guests are extremely grateful because we couldn’t have done it on our own,” Wartnaby said.She added that they had received a lot of food donations from various organisations.“Gift of the Givers have assisted us with disaster relief items. We received a marquee from the Islamic Relief South Africa; they were kind enough to leave it until Tuesday [tomorrow] because we are expecting to have a permanent marquee that will be up for the next few weeks.“We have another tent that was donated by a really sweet couple. What happened is that Doctors Without Borders came in and there was a couple following them and when they got in they asked us if we would like the tent and we said ‘yes’.“So they put the tent up and Doctors Without Borders have been able to have a space to work and speak to people privately. It’s amazing.” The outreach organisation had promised to return.“At the moment if anyone gets ill then we use our own medical GP who has been awesome in seeing people,” she said.Many ordinary South Africans have also committed to helping the family. Stan Goodenough and his wife Mary from Howick said they had donated a tent they were not using. “We saw the story and we were touched by it,” they said.Catherine Taylor, who is the director of BackaBuddy, a fundraising organisation based in Cape Town, said she would be looking at ways to help the family. “We assist organisations and people to raise funds through peer-funding. What we are going to do is set up a page online and we are hoping that people will see it and come forward so that we can assist the family at the farm.”Shahnaaz Paruk from Islamic Relief South Africa said when the organisation heard about the story it had a marquee delivered as a temporary shelter. “There was a request for hygiene packs as well as some groceries. We try to alleviate poverty and assist migrants in whichever way we can.”Source: News24Wirelast_img read more

It’s Verizon iPhone Time! (Or So We Hope)

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#Apple#mobile#news#web Related Posts Verizon has just announced it will be holding a press conference following this week’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES 2011). The invite to the event, which will be held at New York City’s Lincoln Center (Frederick P. Rose Hall) on January 11, is arriving in select journalists’ inboxes as we speak. As for the host? It’s Lowell McAdam, Verizon President and COO.Oh yes, this must be the Verizon iPhone.Given the timing, and the lack of any Apple mention (or even a hint!) during the Verizon keynote at CES, the conclusion is that this is indeed the announcement everyone has been waiting for: the Verizon iPhone, at long last.There’s really no other news beyond that, only this mysterious invite: Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Image credit: AllThingsD – it’s no surprise that they’re on the list. Please, please let it come in white!For more proof of the Verizon iPhone’s existence, see this post: “What’s the status of the Verizon iPhone?“And let’s not forget this recently leaked video from smartphone parts firm Global Direct Parts. The video, which was subsequently pulled from YouTube by either Apple.com (as it claimed) or some jokester claiming to be Apple (DMCA takedown notices are often automated), appeared to show a comparison of parts between the current iPhone 4 and some future fifth-generation phone.This is a backup copy: sarah perez What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …last_img read more

SEA Games: Bata, dela Cruz bow out in English billiards

first_imgCatriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses LATEST STORIES SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Reyes and Dela Cruz still have a chance to bring home a medal for the Philippines in English billiards singles on Wednesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout Efren “Bata” Reyes at the billiards event in the 29th Southeast Asian Games (SEA Games) in Kuala Lumpur. INQUIRER/ MARIANNE BERMUDEZEfren “Bata” Reyes and Francisco dela Cruz failed to advance to the English billiards doubles quarterfinals in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games on Tuesday at Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre.The Filipino duo fell to the Vietnamese pair of Tran Le Anh Tuan and Nguyen Thanh Binh, 0-3, after getting shut out, 90-100, 33-100, 72-100.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Read Next PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games Young gymnast captures PH’s fifth gold medal View commentslast_img read more

Reyes wants expanded Gilas cadets pool

first_imgPhoto from Fiba.comWith Gilas Pilipinas’ manpower issues as evident as ever, coach Chot Reyes has already broached the idea of introducing a new batch of Gilas cadets to avoid the scheduling conflicts that comes with the new Fiba competition calendar.“Having an expanded pool will allow us to have guys who are not in the PBA, that when scheduling conflicts arise, we’ll always have choices,” he said Thursday in the Chooks-to-Go-hosted homecoming presser at Marco Polo in Ortigas.ADVERTISEMENT Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Blatche status still uncertain as Gilas deals with schedule conflicts for Fiba q’fying Reyes is hopeful that all of these planning will eventually bear fruit in the end, saying, “Hopefully, we keep building until we get to the final objective which is to qualifying for the World Cup and be the best Asian team.” Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Unlike with the original setup between the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) and the PBA where rookies in the national team pool were dispersed to all 12 teams, Reyes said that the idea is to have a core group similar to that of the old Smart Gilas, where the best amateur players will be tapped to form the core of the national team pool.“Hopefully, in so doing, we’re able to train up enough players to form a competitive group even though there are complications with the pro leagues,” he said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThough the idea is still at its formative stage, Reyes shared that the SBP has already made a list of possible players to tap.“We know everyone who has potential, and everyone who are coming out, but we don’t want to touch those who are in college now. We know the problems that they will have in college teams,” he said. “We’re keeping tabs on everyone who we think are worthy, but right now, we want to focus on the guys who has no any collegiate obligations.”center_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Read Next UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension LATEST STORIES Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

Pumaren on UE’s 0-4 start: ‘We need everyone to contribute’

first_imgAfter scoring at least 20 points against University of the Philippines and Far Eastern University, Derige scored just six against Ateneo.Pasaol, meanwhile, scored his first 20-point game of the season against the Blue Eagles but was moderate at best in his first three matches.“We can’t afford to just have one player scoring for us, it should be all of them,” said Pumaren in Filipino.“We need contributions from all the players. What happened was, we give one guy a break then all of a sudden we lose control of the game.”ADVERTISEMENT Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Read Next The Red Warriors are tied with University of Santo Tomas at the bottom of the standings at 0-4 and Pumaren said they have to “get their acts together” to win.“So far, it’s one guy coming up, but we need everyone to contribute. We need a total team effort and that’s what we don’t have now.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Red Warriors have been gravely inconsistent in their four-game skid with two of its top players failing to establish rhythm this late in the first round.Alvin Pasaol, in the four-game span, averaged 15.2 points while Clark Derige is at 13.8 points a game but the two haven’t put up solid numbers consistently. UAAP Season 80 Preview: Ateneo Blue Eagles PLAY LIST 03:16UAAP Season 80 Preview: Ateneo Blue Eagles02:56UAAP Season 80 Preview: UE Red Warriors00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games MOST READ UE Red Warriors coach Derrick Pumaren. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netUniversity of the East has yet to win a single game in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament, and with three games left in the first round head coach Derrick Pumaren knows time is not on the Red Warriors side.“We’re not in a state of panic but if we want to have a better performance this season we have to make our move,” said Pumaren Sunday after losing to Ateneo 83-65 at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Chooks Pilipinas books quarters slot, beats Thailand’s Mono Vampire LATEST STORIES Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. View commentslast_img read more

England vs India 3rd Test: Scorecard

first_imgEngland captain Alastair Cook on Sunday won the toss and elected to bat in the third cricket Test against India here on Sunday.Cook and Robson are on the crease.India have brought in debutant Pankaj Singh after pacer Ishant Sharma was ruled out due to injury. Besides, batsman Rohit Sharma has been drafted in to replace all-rounder Stuart Binny, reported PTI.England win toss, bat first. Pankaj to debut, Ishant rested. Rohit in for Stuart. #EngvsInd pic.twitter.com/iRVuwfMge5; BCCI (@BCCI) July 27, 2014England have made three changes, bringing in Chris Woakes, Chris Jordan and Jos Buttler.Teams:India: Mahendra Singh Dhoni (capt/wk), M Vijay, Shikhar Dhawan, Cheteshwar Pujara, Virat Kohli, Ajinkya Rahane, Rohit Sharma, Ravindra Jadeja, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Panjak Singh, Mohammed Shami.England: Alastair Cook (capt), Sam Robson, Gary Ballance, Ian Bell, Joe Root, Moeen Ali, Jos Buttler (wk), Chris Jordan, Stuart Broad, Chris Woakes, James Anderson. LIVE SCORECARDlast_img read more