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Question mark kid

first_imgProfessor Carolyn Rude, chairwoman of the university’s English department, said Cho’s writing was so disturbing that he had been referred to the university’s counseling service. “Sometimes, in creative writing, people reveal things and you never know if it’s creative or if they’re describing things, if they’re imagining things or just how real it might be,” Rude said. “But we’re all alert to not ignore things like this.” She said she did not know when he was referred for counseling, or what the outcome was. Rude refused to release any of his writings or his grades, citing privacy laws. The counseling service refused to comment. Cho, who came to the United States from South Korea in 1992 and was raised in suburban Washington, D.C., where his parents worked at a dry cleaners, left a note that was found after the bloodbath. A law enforcement official who read Cho’s note described it Tuesday as a typed, eight-page rant against rich kids and religion. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. “You caused me to do this,” the official quoted the note as saying. Cho indicated in his letter that the end was near and that there was a deed to be done, the official said. He also expressed disappointment in his own religion, and made several references to Christianity, the official said. The official said the letter was either found in Cho’s dorm room or in his backpack. The backpack was found in the hallway of the classroom building where the shootings happened, and contained several rounds of ammunition, the official said. Col. Steve Flaherty, superintendent of the Virginia State Police, said authorities were going through a considerable number of writings. Citing unidentified sources, the Chicago Tribune reported Cho had recently set a fire in a dorm room and had stalked some women. Monday’s rampage consisted of two attacks, more than two hours apart – first at a dormitory, where two people were killed, then inside a classroom building, where 31 people, including Cho, died. Two handguns – a 9 mm and a .22-caliber – were found in the classroom building. The Washington Post quoted law enforcement sources as saying Cho died with the words “Ismail Ax” in red ink on one of his arms, but they were not sure what that meant. According to court papers, police found a “bomb threat” note – directed at engineering school buildings – near the victims in the classroom building. In the past three weeks, Virginia Tech was hit with two other bomb threats, but investigators have not connected those earlier threats to Cho. Cho graduated from Westfield High School in Chantilly, Va., in 2003. His family lived in an off-white, two-story townhouse in Centreville, Va. At least one of those killed in the rampage, Reema Samaha, graduated from Westfield High in 2006. But there was no immediate word from authorities on whether Cho knew the young woman and singled her out. “He was very quiet, always by himself,” neighbor Abdul Shash said. Shash said Cho spent a lot of his free time playing basketball and would not respond if someone greeted him. Classmates painted a similar picture. Julie Poole, who shared two classes with Cho, didn’t even know his name until Tuesday. After his antics during the first day of British literature class last year, “we just really knew him as the question mark kid,” Poole said. Cho spent much of that class sitting in the back of the room, wearing a hat and seldom participating. In a small department, Cho distinguished himself for being anonymous. “He didn’t reach out to anyone. He never talked,” Poole said. One law enforcement official said Cho’s backpack contained a receipt for a March purchase of a Glock 9 mm pistol. Cho held a green card, meaning he was a legal, permanent resident. That meant he was eligible to buy a handgun unless he had been convicted of a felony. Roanoke Firearms owner John Markell said his shop sold the Glock and a box of practice ammo to Cho 36 days ago for $571. “He was a nice, clean-cut college kid. We won’t sell a gun if we have any idea at all that a purchase is suspicious,” Markell said. Investigators stopped short of saying Cho carried out both attacks, although State Police ballistics tests showed one gun was used in both. Two law enforcement officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because the information had not been announced, also said Cho’s fingerprints were on both guns, whose serial numbers had been filed off. Gov. Tim Kaine said he will appoint a panel at the university’s request to review authorities’ handling of the disaster. Parents and students bitterly complained that the university should have locked down the campus immediately after the first burst of gunfire and did not do enough to warn people. Kaine warned against making snap judgments and said he had “nothing but loathing” for those who take the tragedy and “make it their political hobby horse to ride.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! What was emerging was a chilling portrait of a 23-year-old loner who alarmed his professors with twisted creative writing and left a rambling note in his dorm room raging against women and rich kids. Even when authorities identified him in connection with the shooting that killed 33 people, including Cho, some classmates in the close-knit English department didn’t know for sure who he was until they saw his photograph. News reports said that he may have been taking medication for depression and that he was becoming increasingly violent and erratic. A student who attended Virginia Tech last fall provided obscenity- and violence-laced screenplays that he said Cho wrote as part of a playwriting class. One was about a fight between a stepson and his stepfather, and involved throwing of hammers and attacks with a chainsaw. Another was about students fantasizing about stalking and killing a teacher who sexually molested them. “When we read Cho’s plays, it was like something out of a nightmare. The plays had really twisted, macabre violence that used weapons I wouldn’t have even thought of,” former classmate Ian MacFarlane, now an AOL employee, wrote in a blog posted on an AOL Web site. He said he and other students “were talking to each other with serious worry about whether he could be a school shooter.” “We always joked we were just waiting for him to do something, waiting to hear about something he did,” said another classmate, Stephanie Derry. “But when I got the call it was Cho who had done this, I started crying, bawling.” BLACKSBURG, Va. – His classmates knew him only as “the question mark kid.” On the first day of class last year, when everyone introduced himself, Cho Seung-Hui sat sullenly in the back of the room and refused to speak. On the sign-in sheet, he had put only a question mark for his name. Everyone knew Cho’s name Tuesday after he was identified as the gunman in the worst shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, but his reason remained a question mark. “He was a loner, and we’re having difficulty finding information about him,” school spokesman Larry Hincker said. last_img read more

Half-time: Crystal Palace 0 Chelsea 1

first_imgOscar’s brilliant free-kick after six minutes put Chelsea in command at Selhurst Park, where both sides have since been reduced to 10 men. Oscar swept the ball past keeper Julian Speroni from 30 yards but Crystal Palace caused the visitors plenty of problems before Cesar Azpilicueta and then Eagles defender Damien Delaney were sent off late in the first half.Azpilicueta was shown a straight red card for a reckless challenge on Mile Jedinak and a couple of minutes later Delaney was dismissed for a second bookable offence following a foul on Loic Remy.Neil Warnock’s side made the early running and Blues keeper Thibaut Courtois denied Frazier Campbell before Azpilicueta did well to clear Yannick Bolasie’s dangerous cross.Palace remained a threat after going behind and Campbell dragged a shot wide from an awkward angle after going past Gary Cahill.Remy started for Chelsea in the absence of Diego Costa, who was left out because of ongoing concerns over the striker’s hamstring issue.John Terry started as Chelsea’s captain for the 500th time and is also equalling Frank Lampard’s club record of 429 Premier League appearances. Crystal Palace: Speroni, Kelly, Hangeland, Delaney, Ward, Bolasie, Jedinak, McArthur, Ledley, Puncheon, Campbell.Subs: Mariappa, Guedioura, Doyle, Zaha, Hennessey, Gayle, Chamakh. Chelsea: Courtois; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Matic, Fabregas; Willian (Filipe Luis 41) Oscar, Hazard; Remy.Subs: Cech, Zouma, Mikel, Salah, Drogba, Solanke.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Corruption in Big Science Exposed

first_imgA commentator chastises scientists and their leaders for contributing to the destruction of the civilization that nourishes them.Colin Macilwain, a commentator for Nature, is of a rare breed willing to expose the biases of his bosses. He attended the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) last month and had a great time. The sessions were stimulating, the fellowship was great, and lots of good ideas were shared about “how to engage the public,” the theme of the meeting.The only trouble was what was going on outside the hotel — in the United States and the world at large.In fact, the AAAS meeting took place in a sort of semi-conscious never-never land. The science-policy crowd talked a great game even as the pillars of the republic crashed noisily down around their heads.And thus he launches into a sermon to fellow scientists about their role in current events. His opinions about Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz or France’s “far-right politician Marine Le Pen” are, as could be expected, along a liberal line, but that’s not as important as his opinion about his scientific colleagues. In their “semi-conscious ever-never land” bubble, his colleagues at the AAAS meeting were oblivious to the role their own institutions have played in worrisome trends Macilwain sees as threatening western civilization. Supporters of Trump, Cruz and Sanders, he notes, were not involved in the discussions.They never are. Senior scientists are instead inextricably linked to the centrist, free-market political establishment that has tended to rule, but which is now falling dangerously from public favour.Whether his assessment of blame is on target or not, Macilwain is more upset with Big Science. Western civilization is on the rocks, falling like Rome, and all scientists want to do is keep returning to the government for money to support their own interests.Many laboratory researchers perceive this, I fear, to be someone else’s problem. But it isn’t. If the West is really in its decline-and-fall stage, its Caligula stage, its Donald Trump stage, then this isn’t just an issue for political and financial elites. It’s also a problem for the ‘experts’ who crawl around after these elites, massaging their egos and defending their interests.Trump supporters will certainly be outraged at being associated with Caligula! Nevertheless, Macilwain doesn’t care so much whether it is Trump or Sanders who is at fault. Scientists are the ones who need repentance. They pretend to be above it all, but they are as guilty as everyone, thinking themselves impartial and above the fray.The problem extends down into the community itself. We like to talk about ‘engaging the public’, but many scientists really just want to talk at them. And too many ordinary scientists hold politicians in utter intellectual contempt — even though it is the scientists who have chosen a career that allows them to pursue relatively simple problems (such as building a machine to detect gravitational waves) rather than genuinely difficult ones (such as running a social-care programme in a small town).And those senior scientists who do engage with the government or public — as scientific advisers, for example — often take up highly political positions without acknowledging that they are doing so. For example, they support free-trade agreements that cede the right of democratic governments to control things such as cigarette advertising or pesticide use without hard, scientific evidence. This is a political position that is pursued with great dedication by global corporations — and that is haplessly bought into by many scientists without a thought for its consequences.His hyperbole should hit a nerve. What? Detecting gravitational waves is simpler than running a social care program? Doesn’t Colin know how expensive the detector was, and how many years of work that took? His point sinks in on reflection. Real people outside the walls of establishment science are facing real-life problems that are difficult for them. They couldn’t care less about gravitational waves. Yet scientists proudly “talk at them” about reality, pretending to know what’s important. As elitists, they fail to recognize or acknowledge their own political biases.Some individual scientists or groups of scientists are counteracting the isolationist trend that is hastening the collapse, he notes.But at the top, there is paralysis: leading scientific organizations do little except chase money and reinforce the ruling nexus of politics and finance — even since the financial crisis of 2008, which discredited the free-market philosophy that underpins that nexus. I argued years ago (see Nature 479, 447; 2011) that scientific leaders had failed to respond in any meaningful way to that collapse, and I’m still waiting.The political structure of the West is in deep trouble, and should it fall apart, there will be plenty of blame to go around. Most will go to political and financial elites, or to rowdy mobs. But some will belong to people in the middle who have taken public funds, defended elites and then stood back and watched as democracy got ridden over a cliff.Macilwain is sketchy about his political and economic philosophy. At one point he seems to say that free markets undergird science; here he seems to say the collapse of 2008 discredited the free-market philosophy. It appears he’s portraying an unholy alliance between politics and finance (i.e., big banks). In that case, scientists have been co-conspirators. They take public funds and defend the very elites who collapsed the market and have wrested political power from the hands of citizens. What matters for science is a stable society. You can’t have that in a collapsed civilization run by mobs or by Caligulas.Update 3/17/16: See Wesley J. Smith’s take on Macilwain’s editorial at Evolution News & Views.If you are a conservative, don’t be overly distracted by Macilwain’s mischaracterization of America’s conservative candidates who repeatedly, vociferously advocate for free markets, prosperity and the rule of law (including the end of “crony capitalism” and other forms of corruption). What’s valuable in his editorial is his rare willingness to criticize Big Science. Scientists pretend to want to “engage the public” but the dialogue is all one way. They hold politicians in utter contempt, but run to them for money. They defend elites but fail to recognize their own elitist attitudes.Macilwain, a Brit, was able to state this about the Americans. But we wonder if the Editors of Nature felt he was hitting a little close to home. He was, after all, speaking about western civilization, not just American civilization.  We hope his job is safe; scientists need his voice to shatter their illusions of self-righteousness and intellectual superiority.Still, key factors were missing from his editorial. His country has become utterly secularized. What does that do to the Protestant work ethic that undergirds a market economy? His country has been invaded by Muslim immigrants, many of whom hold western civilization in contempt and prefer a Sharia dictatorship worse than any Rome under Caligula. And while many European countries are retreating from socialism, an America under avowed socialist Bernie Sanders would run up a debt and deficit so rapidly on entitlements, it would quickly dry up scientific funding. Maybe he should think again about those “right wing” candidates and listen to what they really believe about the Constitution, liberty, and free markets. Neither a bankrupt economy nor a dictatorial regime is likely to provide a safe place for science to flourish.We’re not endorsing a candidate in the lively American political scene going on now. We would only like to remind those readers who fear God that the Apostle Paul instructed Timothy to instruct his church: “First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority, so that we may lead a tranquil and quiet life in all godliness and dignity. This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” (I Timothy 2:1-4). A civilization conducive to a “tranquil and quiet life” is good not only for Christ followers, but also for scientists and for social workers in small towns. And need we remind everyone that knowledge of the truth (a goal of science) presupposes a standard of truth that secularism cannot provide? If truth evolves, it’s not the truth. Scientists need to ponder the origin of truth.(Visited 62 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Red root rot plagued Ohio corn in 2016

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest While there were many great results even after a tough year in 2016, there were some real disappointments too. According to Levi Runkle, a Tri-Ag Products, Inc. agronomist, some of those disappointing corn yields may have been partially the result of a rare issue in Ohio — red root rot. Runkle found the unique challenge for Ohio in a surprising number of fields last year.“This is a rare late season destructive disease that leads to lodging. As we went into harvest we started seeing problems with hybrids that don’t usually have problems with lodging or ear drop,” he said. “As we got to looking at it, we started to see a lot of purpling or red on the roots that looked like insect damage. That is something we typically don’t see here. You see it more in the Delaware or Maryland area.”Red root rot. Photo by Levi Runkle.Red root rot needs the right set of conditions to become a problem.“It is brought on by some type of early stress. For us it could have been from the frost damage last year or an early inoculation of Pythium or Fusarium. As you get into the year, red root rot needs an extended period of stress, which we had with drought stress and higher temperatures,” Runkle said. “Then when we got that large rain event in August, it allowed the inoculant for the red root rot to get in. You can have a really good-looking field and in four or five days it is dead. It completely cannibalizes the stalk and shuts down production and stops packing starch, which really affects grain. We can see 20% yield loss from it. The root mass also decays really fast and your stalk decays fast and it causes a lot of lodging, harvest issues and ear drop. It is really nasty. The higher nighttime temperatures towards the end of August also helped this disease thrive. It is very rare to have all of these things come together in Ohio but it happened last year.”According to the University of Illinois, symptoms of red root rot include red or pink discoloration of the root system and lower stalk tissue, early death and shriveling showing up just prior to corn maturity. The red color is deeper and darker than that of Gibberella stalk and root rot and the symptoms can vary among different corn hybrids. The rotting of the roots below ground can lead to wilting and grayish green foliage, premature plant death, and lodging in four to five days.University of Illinois experts said the Phoma terrestris fungus that causes red root rot is associated with Pythium and Fusarium species and can survive in soils with a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. It overwinters as microsclerotia in soil. High yield conditions and moderate temperatures favor the disease.In many cases Runkle thinks red root rot was a problem in more 2016 fields that people realized because other more common issued were blamed.“Some people thought it was rootworm but in some cases in Ohio last year it was red root rot,” he said. “Kernels didn’t fill right because the plant died prematurely.”Runkle does not think red root rot will be a regular problem in Ohio due to the conditions it requires.“Hopefully we don’t see it again for a long time. It does stay in the soil, but you still have to have those other factors for it to be a problem. You have to have a lot of things line up to get this problem,” he said. “I don’t think it will be a regular problem in Ohio.”last_img read more

Mail Today Editor Bharat Bhushan on CWG

first_imgConnect with EditorThe run-up may have been tardy but anyone who went to witness a sports event would tell you that the actual conduct of the Commonwealth Games was superb. That itself is proof enough of the power of public criticism and the vibrancy of Indian democracy.The international media hailed the high-tech opening and closing ceremonies as wonderfully warm and colourful and the Games themselves were quite enthralling. The great Indian wedding has taken place and how.We saw India break into non-traditional sports – especially field events, gymnastics and aquatics. The achievements of sportspersons from small towns and villages showed what India is capable of. They showed how sport can be a great equaliser. Our women sportspersons – some managing a family and children along with their arduous training – did us especially proud by winning a surprisingly large number of medals. New sporting icons were created and hopefully they will inspire many more to emulate them in the villages, towns and cities of this country.In the process of organising the Games, Delhi as a city itself has gained a lot. It has got a brand new airport. The Metro network has expanded to the National Capital Region at a furious pace fuelled by the Commonwealth Games deadlines. The city has suddenly got better roads, better sidewalks, new flyovers and underpasses. The signage on Delhi’s roads suddenly makes sense. There has been a quantum jump in the quality of public transport in the capital with new low-floor buses being introduced in time for the Games. Another 2,000 air-conditioned buses, used for ferrying players and officials of the Games, will be added to the city’s transport fleet.Almost every sports stadium has been rebuilt or overhauled beyond recognition in the NCR. In addition, Delhi has a brand new sports injury facility. A sports infrastructure has been created which with proper legacy planning can give fillip to sports in the country. Apparently plans are in place to put these sports facilities to optimum use with the help of public-private partnership. The thousands of school children who watched the games with rapt attention in the stadia and in front of TV should now be encouraged to get out and play and make use of these facilities through their schools as well as individually.The organisation of the Commonwealth Games has also shown our civic bodies what cleanliness means and what is possible to do with concerted effort. Suddenly, our traffic policemen know that there is no substitute for physical presence in directing traffic rather than following a strategy of “chase and challan”. Delhi Police has learnt to be exceptionally polite as have ordinary Delhiites. The fear of how the world will view us has created a new sense of responsibility. Will it last beyond the Games? One hopes that we will be able to live up to the hospitable and polite image that we have been able to convey to the visiting players and officials from the Commonwealth countries.However, one should not forget that a lot of negativity was associated with the preparations for the Games. The Comptroller and Auditor General’s office, the Enforcement Directorate and the Central Bureau of Investigation must be allowed to probe the mess. Heads must roll and responsibility assigned for the mess that the Delhi government, the Lt. Governor, the Urban Development and Sports ministries and the organising committee of the Commonwealth Games created. Already there is scramble to apportion blame. It should not happen that some hapless bureaucrats are sacrificed to save the bigwigs. The aim in any case should not be witch-hunting but of making our public institutions and people who head them accountable.last_img read more

Touch And Go

first_imgFive Australian Touch Football representatives featured in the Australian Women’s Sevens team in the final of the London Women’s Sevens tournament last weekend.The Australian team finished runners-up to host nation England, going down 36-7, with two wins and a loss in their pool rounds, setting-up a quarter-final clash with Russia (33-7) and semi-final against the USA (28-7).2013 Super Trans Tasman Touch Football representatives, Alicia Quirk, Charlotte Caslick (Women’s Open) and Evania Pelite (18’s Girls) along with 2012 Trans Tasman representatives, Emilee Cherry (Women’s Open) and Nikki Etheridge (Mixed Open), made up almost half the 12-woman squad that were defeated by England in the final.The team will be back on the field this weekend, this time at the final round of the IRB Women’s Sevens World Series event in Amsterdam; enroute to Moscow for the 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens event in June, where they will aim for back-to-back titles.Touch Football Australia congratulates the players on achieving dual International status and wishes them the best of luck for the Amsterdam Sevens and World Cup Sevens event next month. Related LinksTouch And Golast_img read more

Ohio State Football Players Call Out Ignorant Fans For Telling Them To Just Worry About Football

first_imgOhio State Buckeye fans doing the "O-H-I-O" chant.COLUMBUS, OH – SEPTEMBER 27: Ohio State Buckeyes fans cheer on their team against the Minnesota Golden Gophers on September 27, 2008 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. (Photo by Jamie Sabau/Getty Images)A couple of Ohio State’s best players, Cardale Jones and Michael Thomas, took to Twitter this morning to voice their opinions on a social matter. The Buckeyes’ quarterback and wide receiver each published a series of tweets regarding the #BlackLivesMatter movement. While college football players (and most of the population) would probably be better off not ever going on Twitter, it was nice to see two of the sport’s premier players speak their minds. This apparently upset some of Ohio State’s fan base, as Jones and Thomas were both told by Twitter users to stop talking and just worry about the 2015 season. Jones, Thomas and Buckeye quarterback Stephen Collier then used Twitter to call out these fans. Cool it.. We can’t afford the NCAA suspending you https://t.co/bP2TJ9EqtJ— Smash Williams (@matteojustquit) July 23, 2015This my Twitter my voice so mind yah business buddy.. Thank you https://t.co/yon6DFmOK2— Mike Thomas (@Cantguardmike) July 23, [email protected] Sorry Mr master, I aints allow to tweet nothing but foolsball stuff I donts want you think I more than a foots ball playa sir— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) July 23, 2015Ignorant. https://t.co/HtVjQSG1SH— Stephen Collier (@S13Collier) July 23, 2015One thing about your own opinion, ITS YOURS!— Cardale Jones (@CJ12_) July 23, 2015Every college football fan base has its share of psychos, so this is not an indictment on the type of people who root for Ohio State. Keep speaking your mind, Cardale and Michael.last_img read more

This is an agonizing case Alberta stays charges in death of Indigenous

first_imgThe Canadian PressThe Alberta Crown has stayed charges against two caregivers in the death of a four-year-old Indigenous girl.Relatives of the girl known as Serenity were each charged in 2017 of failing to provide the necessaries of life.The Crown says it came to the decision after reassessing evidence called at a preliminary hearing and determined there was no reasonable likelihood of getting convictions.Serenity had a severe brain injury when she was taken to hospital in September 2014 where doctors noticed she was underweight and had multiple bruises.She remained on life support for about a week before she died.Alberta Justice Minister Doug Schweitzer says the United Conservative government was not involved in the decision to stay the charges.“This is an agonizing case,” Schweitzer said in an email Tuesday.“The decision to stay the prosecution was taken independently by the Crown attorneys without any involvement by elected officials.”Schweitzer said that the Crown has one year to potentially reinstate the charges and there is ongoing related litigation and a pending fatality inquiry.When the charges were laid in 2017 the RCMP noted they were related to the circumstances in which the child lived, noting that the specific injury that caused her death was not criminal in nature.At the time of her death Serenity lived on a reserve in the central Alberta community of Maskwacis, south of Edmonton.Last October, her case prompted the then-NDP government to propose legislation that would see First Nations notified if social workers were thinking of removing an Indigenous child from a family’s care.In December 2017, the then Opposition United Conservatives introduced a private member’s bill dubbed Serenity’s Law.It called for requiring adults to report to police any child who needs intervention under the threat of six months in jail or a $10,000 fine.The private member’s bill did not pass.Alberta has about 10,000 children in care; about 60 per cent are from First [email protected]last_img read more

Mens swimming Buckeyes defeat Wright State on Senior Day

Ohio State concludes its dual meets with a victory over Wright State. Credit: Sydney McNulty | Lantern reporterThe Ohio State men’s swimming team won its final dual meet of the season against Wright State, picking up a 153-103 victory at the McCorkle Aquatic Pavilion.Some of the highlight swims for the Buckeyes included a win for sophomore Michael Salazar in 200-yard freestyle (1:39.79), along with senior Mark Belanger and junior Jack Barone both taking home first in their respective events, the 100-yard backstroke (48.62) and 100-yard breaststroke (55.96).Sophomore standout Mossimo Chavez glided to victory in the 50-yard freestyle by matching his time last week against Michigan, touching the wall in a time of 20.73 seconds.“I felt good today,” Chavez said. “Dual meets are just another opportunity for us to race and to prepare for the next couple of weeks.”The Buckeyes seized the opportunity by sweeping every single event, but for the seniors, the meet meant more than just another win.“It’s been a pretty emotional meet for me,” senior Matt Moen said. “ It’s definitely different because all these years we saw the older guys go through it, and you never think of you going through it yourselves. We were over there and talking, and we were like, ‘Wow this is pretty real that we are going to be in the real world soon,’ so that adds a little bit of energy too, which is always good.”Moen finished 3rd in the 200-yard breaststroke behind two fellow Buckeyes.Moving forward, however, the Buckeyes as a unit are focused on the rest of the season, using every meet as a chance to get ready for the Big Ten Championships in Columbus on Feb. 22-25.“It is a rehearsal for Big Tens,” Moen said. “The next couple of weeks are just trying to work on the details. We put in a lot of work the last couple of months, so at this point it’s just working on technique so we can perform as well as we need to.”Up next the Buckeyes will host the OSU Winter Invitational on Saturday, Feb. 11. read more

Captain Nash leads Jackets on West Coast road trip

Despite a 6-3 loss at Calgary Tuesday night, Columbus Blue Jackets fans have plenty to get excited about watching captain Rick Nash. The 25-year-old dazzled Calgary (6-2-1) goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff with his team-high fourth goal of the season. Down two men, Nash sped into the Flames’ zone, beating defenseman Dion Phaneuf to a loose puck. Sweeping past Kiprusoff, the Jackets’ star sent the puck to the back of the net as Calgary fans sat in a daze looking on.Calgary was outworked by the Blue Jackets (5-2-0) in the second period, but mustered three unanswered goals against second-year goaltender Steve Mason to complete the win. Nash commented on Mason’s play after the game.“Everyone will have bad nights,” said Nash, who has collected a point in each of his last six games. “[Mason’s] won us a lot of games by himself and we didn’t give him much support.”Columbus will need to forget about the loss quickly as the Blue Jackets return to the ice in Edmonton at 9:30 p.m. Thursday. The team will wrap up the four-game road swing in six days with night matchups at Anaheim Saturday and at Los Angeles Sunday.Special teams successSpecial teams have been a strong point this year for the Jackets.The team collected two power play goals against the Flames and have converted 7 of 28 opportunities (25 percent) this season, which is ninth in the league.“We’ve done a lot of work on the power plays,” coach Ken Hitchcock said. “I think the players are comfortable with the transition we’ve had with it.”The Jackets continued their dominance shorthanded against Calgary and have now killed 28-of-29 (96.55 percent) opponent power plays this season, which is first in the NHL.“We made some significant changes in killing penalties,” Hitchcock said. “That’s been the most consistent, solid part of our game. We’ve tried to incorporate six forwards and be more comfortable doing that, rather than just using the four. We’re trying to have harder, more competitive reads in the penalty kill, and so far, it’s working.”Scouting the Oilers, Kings and DucksThe Jackets will have their hands full against the Edmonton Oilers (5-2-1), who have scored 29 goals in eight games. Oiler forward Dustin Penner has collected five goals with four assists to collect nine points early in the 2009-10 campaign.Columbus is 3-3-2 in the past eight games against Edmonton and will hope to take down the squad from the Northwest Division.Looking ahead to Anaheim (3-3-1), the Blue Jackets will need to take advantage of a struggling Ducks team at home. In the past three home games, Anaheim is 1-2-0 and has been outscored 11 to four. Right wing Corey Perry leads the Ducks with four goals and three assists in seven games.Rounding out the weekend in southern California, the Jackets will meet the Kings for the second time this season. Columbus defeated LA, 4-1, at home Oct. 17.During that game, forward Raffi Torres broke a tie on a power play goal late in the second period, while Nash contributed with a shorthanded goal.The Jackets won three consecutive meetings against the Kings and hope to return to Columbus Monday with a winning state of mind.“If we’re going to be a better team, we need better play from those top six guys if we’re going to get to the next level,” Hitchcock said. read more