2018上海哪里有油压

MAN KICKED IN DOOR AFTER OBSCENITIES SHOUTED AT HIM

first_imgA man who kicked in the front door of house after a man shouted obscenities at him from an upstairs window of the premises has appeared in court.Joseph McCormack kicked in the front door of the Cornerstone House in Kilmacrennan on August 29th last.When he went inside, he was met by a young woman whom he pushed aside onto some stairs. Letterkenny District Court was told that McCormick had been passing outside the house when a man began shouting at him.There was ‘bad blood’ between both men going back as far as their schooldays, the court was told.Solicitor for McCormick, of Ballyboe, Kilmacrennan, Patsy Gallagher, said the man had been shouting obscenities from the pub provoking his client.However Judge Paul Kelly said he was not concerned about the history between the two men.“He can’t try kick in a door and violate property and a person and expect to be dealt leniently,” he said.The court heard that McCormick has a number of previous convictions for various offences including public order and not having insurance.Judge Kelly sentenced McCormack to 80 hours community service and fined him €300.MAN KICKED IN DOOR AFTER OBSCENITIES SHOUTED AT HIM was last modified: March 12th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Two new Saturnmass exoplanets discovered

first_img Explore further Citation: Two new Saturn-mass exoplanets discovered (2017, May 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-saturn-mass-exoplanets.html The planets were discovered by researchers working as part of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) group and the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA) collaboration. OGLE uses the 1.3-m Warsaw Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, while MOA utilizes the 1.8-m MOA-II telescope at the Mount John University Observatory, located in New Zealand. The main goal of these two microlensing surveys is to study the planet formation around late-type stars.Gravitational microlensing is an invaluable method of detecting new extrasolar planets circling their parent stars relatively closely. This technique is sensitive to planets orbiting beyond the so-called “snow line” around relatively faint host stars like M dwarfs or brown dwarfs. It is a location in the proto-planetary disk where the water ice may condense and where gas giant planets are believed to be formed. Therefore, understanding the distribution of exoplanets in this region could offer important clues to how planets form.Recently, OGLE and MOA scientists led by Przemek Mróz of the Warsaw University Observatory in Poland, have found planetary anomalies in two faint microlensing events designated OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721. “Both events showed clear deviations from the simple point-source point-lens model, caused by the presence of a second body with well-measured planet-to-host mass ratios of (5.15 ± 0.28) x 10-4 and (13.18 ± 0.72) x 10-4, respectively,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The newly discovered planets received designation OGLE-2013-BLG-0132b and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721b. Both planets likely belong to a group of sub-Jupiter-mass planets orbiting M dwarfs beyond the snow line distance.According to the research, OGLE-2013-BLG-0132b has a mass of about 0.29 Jupiter masses and orbits its parent star at a distance of 3.6 AU. The planet’s host is located about 12,700 light years away and has a mass of approximately 0.54 solar masses. With a mass of about 0.64 Jupiter masses, OGLE-2013-BLG-1721b is circling its host (0.46 solar masses) at a distance of 2.6 AU. This planetary system is located some 20,500 light years away from the Earth.The researchers estimated the masses of the planets using the Bayesian analysis as both events were short and faint, which prevented them from measuring a reliable parallax signal.”Both events were too short and too faint to measure a reliable parallax signal and hence the lens mass. We therefore used a Bayesian analysis to estimate masses of both planets,” the paper reads.The team noted that in order to uncover more properties of the two newly discovered planetary systems, follow-up high-resolution imaging observations should be conducted in the future. In particular, the Near InfRared Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) that will be launched into space in late 2018, could reveal important insights about these new Saturn-mass exoworlds. Light curve of OGLE-2013-BLG-0132. The inset shows the enlargement of the caustic crossing parts of the light curve. The lower panel shows the residuals from the best-fit model. Credit: Mróz et al., 2017. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers has detected two new giant alien worlds circling distant stars. The newly found planets are estimated to be as massive as Saturn and are orbiting M dwarfs beyond the snow line. The findings were presented May 2 in a paper published online on the arXiv pre-print server. More information: OGLE-2013-BLG-0132Lb and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721Lb: Two Saturn-mass Planets Discovered around M-dwarfs, arXiv:1705.01058 [astro-ph.EP] arxiv.org/abs/1705.01058AbstractWe present the discovery of two planetary systems consisting of a Saturn-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf, which were detected in faint microlensing events OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 and OGLE-2013-BLG-1721. The planetary anomalies were covered with high cadence by OGLE and MOA photometric surveys. The light curve modeling indicates that planet-host mass ratios are (5.15±0.28)×10−4 and (13.18±0.72)×10−4, respectively. Both events were too short and too faint to measure a reliable parallax signal and hence the lens mass. We therefore used a Bayesian analysis to estimate masses of both planets: 0.29+0.16−0.13 MJup (OGLE-2013-BLG-0132Lb) and 0.64+0.35−0.31 MJup (OGLE-2013-BLG-1721Lb). Thanks to a high relative proper motion, OGLE-2013-BLG-0132 is a promising candidate for the high-resolution imaging follow-up. Both planets belong to an increasing sample of sub-Jupiter-mass planets orbiting M-dwarfs beyond the snow line. © 2017 Phys.org Massive exoplanet discovered using gravitational microlensing methodlast_img read more

A Gadget That Detects Gluten With 4 Million in Funding This Startup

first_img 6SensorLabs is on a mission to help people with food allergies worry less when they go out to eat. And it just got a bit closer to that goal.The San Francisco-based company raised $4 million in seed funding this week from Upfront Ventures, Lemnos Labs, SK Ventures, SoftTech VC, Mitch Kapor and Xandex Investments.Founded by CEO Shireen Yates and CTO Scott Sundvor, the company has been hard at work developing a portable sensor that will identify gluten in food (we wrote about them here back in July). Yates says the funding will be used to optimize technology and launch the final product. The company hopes to bring the sensor to market in early 2015.Related: 3 Culinary Startups Heating Up the Food IndustryThe sensor is still in development, and so far there are no firm details on its pricepoint, but the goal is for it to be marketed for affordable and personal use. There will also be an accompanying mobile app where users can report the results of the testing as well as share their restaurant experiences to help others who are avoiding gluten for health reasons. The company is starting with gluten, but plans to expand to other allergens.  Related: Investors Are Hungry for Food Startups  2 min read Register Now » Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.center_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals September 12, 2014last_img read more